a city in SE Massachusetts.
burn2 .
a brook or rivulet.
Contemporary Examples

Hollywood’s War on Drones Andrew Romano May 22, 2014
Is ‘Skyfall’ the Best (and Gayest) James Bond Movie Yet? Ramin Setoodeh, Marlow Stern November 8, 2012
‘The Bourne Legacy’ Starring Jeremy Renner: 7 Reasons to See It! Ramin Setoodeh August 9, 2012
The Revolt Against the Masses and the Roots of Modern Liberalism Fred Siegel January 25, 2014
‘The Bourne Legacy’ Starring Jeremy Renner: 7 Reasons to See It! Ramin Setoodeh August 9, 2012

Historical Examples

Acton’s Feud Frederick Swainson
Victor’s Triumph Mrs. E. D. E. N. Southworth
The Hardy Country Charles G. Harper
The Shellback’s Progress Walter Runciman
Acton’s Feud Frederick Swainson

noun (archaic)
a destination; goal
a boundary
(mainly Southern English) a stream, esp an intermittent one in chalk areas Compare burn2
verb burns, burning, burnt, burned
to undergo or cause to undergo combustion
to destroy or be destroyed by fire
(transitive) to damage, injure, or mark by heat: he burnt his hand, she was burnt by the sun
to die or put to death by fire: to burn at the stake
(intransitive) to be or feel hot: my forehead burns
to smart or cause to smart: brandy burns one’s throat
(intransitive) to feel strong emotion, esp anger or passion
(transitive) to use for the purposes of light, heat, or power: to burn coal
(transitive) to form by or as if by fire: to burn a hole
to char or become charred: the potatoes are burning in the saucepan
(transitive) to brand or cauterize
(transitive) to cut (metal) with an oxygen-rich flame
to produce by or subject to heat as part of a process: to burn charcoal
(transitive) to copy information onto (a CD-ROM)
(astronomy) to convert (a lighter element) to a heavier one by nuclear fusion in a star: to burn hydrogen
(cards, mainly Brit) to discard or exchange (one or more useless cards)
(transitive; usually passive) (informal) to cheat, esp financially
(slang, mainly US) to electrocute or be electrocuted
(transitive) (Austral, slang) to drive fast (esp in the phrase go for a burn)
burn one’s bridges, burn one’s boats, to commit oneself to a particular course of action with no possibility of turning back
burn the candle at both ends, See candle (sense 3)
burn one’s fingers, to suffer from having meddled or been rash
an injury caused by exposure to heat, electrical, chemical, or radioactive agents. Burns are classified according to the depth of tissue affected: first-degree burn: skin surface painful and red; second-degree burn: blisters appear on the skin; third-degree burn: destruction of both epidermis and dermis
a mark, e.g. on wood, caused by burning
a controlled use of rocket propellant, esp for a course correction
a hot painful sensation in a muscle, experienced during vigorous exercise: go for the burn!
(Austral & NZ) a controlled fire to clear an area of scrub
(slang) tobacco or a cigarette
(Scot & Northern English) a small stream; brook

The dread of something after death, The vndiscouered Countrey; from whose Borne No Traueller returnes. [“Hamlet” III.i.79]




Noun Tissue injury caused by fire, heat, radiation (such as sun exposure), electricity, or a caustic chemical agent. Burns are classified according to the degree of tissue damage, which can include redness, blisters, skin edema and loss of sensation. Bacterial infection is a serious and sometimes fatal complication of severe burns.

Becoming angry: He didn’t blow up, just did a slow burn (1930s+)
Cheat or swindle: It was a burn, but it didn’t start out to be
: I didn’t mean it as a burn (mid-1890s+)

To cook or heat food: Let’s burn a couple of hot dogs (1950s+)
To put or be put to death in the electric chair; fry (1925+)
To kill; assassinate (1930s+)
To become angry; burn up: I burned but went on singing (1930s+)
To anger; infuriate; PISS someone OFF: You must have done something to burn him (1935+)
To cheat; swindle; victimize; rob; rip off: If you go along with that guy you’ll get burned (late 1600s+)
To assault or fight a rival gang or gang member (1950s+ Street gang)
To harass a person relentlessly; hound: I’ll burn you right off the force (1950s+)
To insult; put down •This seems to be a spontaneous verb form that coincides with the much older noun: I burned this chick. ”Whereja get those jeans, like Sears or something?”/ The Administration only turned to her after it felt burned by two ”Eastern elitists” (1970s+ Teenagers & students)
To infect or become infected with a venereal disease (1500s+)
To pass; spend; waste; kill: I’ll start a conversation just to burn time/ if it burns tomorrow afternoon
To move very rapidly; speed; barrel: He wasn’t just running, he was burning (1880s+)
To perform, esp to improvise, superbly; excel; Be Hot: The cat was getting down and burning (1950s+ Jazz musicians)
To borrow; beg (1970s+)
To throw something, esp a baseball, very fast: He burned the fastball right down the middle (1940s+)
To outdo; outshine in competition: Tony has burned the guy/ the way Dex burned Eddie on that last number
To make a xerographic copy: Will you burn me ten copies of this? (1980s+ Army)
To expose as an informer: Do you really want to spend valuable man-hours trying to find out who burned him? (1950s+ Police)

burn at the stake
burn down
burn in effigy
burn into
burn off
burn one’s bridges
burn one’s fingers
burn oneself out
burn out
burn rubber
burn someone up
burn the candle at both ends
burn the midnight oil
burn to a cinder
burn up


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