a wind or current of air, especially a light or moderate one.
a wind of 4–31 miles per hour (2–14 m/sec).
Informal. an easy task; something done or carried on without difficulty:
Finding people to join in the adventure was a breeze.
Chiefly British Informal. a disturbance or quarrel.
(of the wind) to blow a breeze (usually used impersonally with it as subject):
It breezed from the west all day.
to move in a self-confident or jaunty manner:
She breezed up to the police officer and asked for directions.
Informal. to proceed quickly and easily; move rapidly without intense effort (often followed by along, into, or through):
He breezed through the task. The car breezed along the highway.
to cause to move in an easy or effortless manner, especially at less than full speed:
The boy breezed the horse around the track.
breeze in, Slang.

to win effortlessly:
He breezed in with an election plurality of 200,000.
Also, breeze into/ move or act with a casual or careless attitude:
He breezed out without paying attention to anyone.

breeze up, Atlantic States. to become windy.
shoot / bat the breeze, Slang.

to converse aimlessly; chat.
to talk nonsense or exaggerate the truth:
He likes to shoot the breeze, so don’t take everything he says seriously.

Historical Examples

The Seiners James B. (James Brendan) Connolly
The Mutiny of the Elsinore Jack London
The Delegate from Venus Henry Slesar
The Spook Ballads William Theodore Parkes
Wilderness of Spring Edgar Pangborn
There She Blows! William Hussey Macy
An Arrow in a Sunbeam Various
The Story of Don Quixote Arvid Paulson, Clayton Edwards, and Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
The Million-Dollar Suitcase Alice MacGowan
The Wrecker Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne

a gentle or light wind
(meteorol) a wind of force two to six inclusive on the Beaufort scale
(informal) an easy task or state of ease: being happy here is a breeze
(informal, mainly Brit) a disturbance, esp a lively quarrel
(informal) shoot the breeze, to chat
verb (intransitive)
to move quickly or casually: he breezed into the room
(of wind) to blow: the south wind breezed over the fields
an archaic or dialect name for the gadfly
ashes of coal, coke, or charcoal used to make breeze blocks

An easy task; anything easy; cinch, cakewalk (1920s+ Baseball)
: They had a breeze today at Ossining

To go or move rapidly and easily: to breeze through work/ I breezed out (1907+)
To escape from prison (1940s+ Prison)

In addition to the idiom beginning with


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