Carnally



pertaining to or characterized by the flesh or the body, its passions and appetites; sensual:
carnal pleasures.
not spiritual; merely human; temporal; worldly:
a man of secular, rather carnal, leanings.
Contemporary Examples

Stated simply and carnally: “There are some cuties on there [Tinder].”
Does Sex Really Distract Olympians? Kent Sepkowitz February 15, 2014

Historical Examples

Andrew told him about his trip home and the arrangements he had made with carnally, and left soon afterward.
For the Allinson Honor Harold Bindloss

To be carnally minded is death; but to be spiritually minded is life and peace.
Italy, the Magic Land Lilian Whiting

To be carnally minded is death; to be spiritually minded is life and peace.
Essays on Russian Novelists William Lyon Phelps

His reserve and lack of response were not in accordance with what he knew of carnally.
For the Allinson Honor Harold Bindloss

Were you not with carnally when he broke out of the prison camp?
For the Allinson Honor Harold Bindloss

“It might pay—them,” said carnally with suggestive emphasis.
For the Allinson Honor Harold Bindloss

carnally called the Chinaman, who took the plate away and substituted a piece of pie and one or two desiccated apricots.
For the Allinson Honor Harold Bindloss

“Mr. Graham is treasurer for the sawmill,” carnally explained.
For the Allinson Honor Harold Bindloss

When they had examined the cavity made by the explosion, carnally covered it with snow, and picked up the broken bits of rock.
For the Allinson Honor Harold Bindloss

adjective
relating to the appetites and passions of the body; sensual; fleshly
adv.

late 15c., “sexually;” 1530s, “corporeally,” from carnal + -ly (2).
adj.

c.1400, “physical, human, mortal,” from Old French carnal and directly from Medieval Latin carnalis “natural, of the same blood,” from Latin carnis “of the flesh,” genitive of caro “flesh, meat” (see carnage). Meaning “sensual” is from early 15c.; that of “worldly, sinful” is from mid-15c. Carnal knowledge is attested from early 15c. and was in legal use by 1680s.

Unconverted men are so called (1 Cor. 3:3). They are represented as of a “carnal mind, which is enmity against God” (Rom. 8:6, 7). Enjoyments that minister to the wants and desires of man’s animal nature are so called (Rom. 15:27; 1 Cor. 9:11). The ceremonial of the Mosaic law is spoken of as “carnal,” because it related to things outward, the bodies of men and of animals, and the purification of the flesh (Heb. 7:16; 9:10). The weapons of Christian warfare are “not carnal”, that is, they are not of man’s device, nor are wielded by human power (2 Cor. 10:4).

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  • Carnality

    pertaining to or characterized by the flesh or the body, its passions and appetites; sensual: carnal pleasures. not spiritual; merely human; temporal; worldly: a man of secular, rather carnal, leanings. Historical Examples Pride and nearly every other manifestation of carnality were manifest. Birth of a Reformation Andrew Byers They claim that no thought of carnality […]



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    Chiefly Law. sexual intercourse. noun (mainly law) sexual intercourse have carnal knowledge of, to have sexual intercourse with

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    Law. any lascivious contact with the sexual organs of a child by an adult, especially without sexual intercourse. rape, especially of a young girl.



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