a merchant vessel having various rigs, used especially by Mediterranean countries in the 15th and 16th centuries; galleon.
Historical Examples

She caught fire from a large French carrack, called the Marie la Cordelière, which she was attacking.
Ancient and Modern Ships. George C. V. Holmes

Francisco and his bible are no more credible than the carrack and the bishop.
The Pirate and The Three Cutters Frederick Marryat

I shall have everything ready, and mules waiting, so that we may go straight to the muelle—the wharf to which the carrack is tied.
House of Torment Cyril Arthur Edward Ranger Gull

In 1602 a Portuguese carrack of 1,600 tons was captured at Cezimbra.
Ancient and Modern Ships. George C. V. Holmes

With the remainder of his vessels Spinola crept out of sight while the English were ransacking the carrack.
History of the United Netherlands, 1600-09, Vol. IV. Complete John Lothrop Motley

“So I thought,” pursued Mr. carrack, rolling his eyes and heaving an infant sigh from his bosom.
Chanticleer Cornelius Mathews

In the sixteenth century the carrack often attained the size of 1,600 tons.
Ancient and Modern Ships. George C. V. Holmes

One carrack especially, commanded by Lawrence Foglietta resisted the attacks of seven English ships.
How Britannia Came to Rule the Waves W.H.G. Kingston

In 1592 a Portuguese carrack called the Madre de Dios was captured and brought home.
Ancient and Modern Ships. George C. V. Holmes

The carrack, which was brought home in safety, was larger than any man-of-war or merchantman belonging to England.
How Britannia Came to Rule the Waves W.H.G. Kingston

a galleon sailed in the Mediterranean as a merchantman in the 15th and 16th centuries

merchant ship, late 14c., from Old French caraque “large, square-rigged sailing vessel,” from Spanish carraca, related to Medieval Latin carraca, Italian caracca, all of uncertain origin, perhaps from Arabic qaraqir, plural of qurqur “merchant ship.” The Arabic word perhaps was from Latin carricare (see charge (v.)) or Greek karkouros “boat, pinnacle.”


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