Carrel



Also called cubicle, stall. a small recess or enclosed area in a library stack, designed for individual study or reading.
a table or desk with three sides extending above the writing surface to serve as partitions, designed for individual study, as in a library.
Alexis
[uh-lek-sis;; French a-lek-see] /əˈlɛk sɪs;; French a lɛkˈsi/ (Show IPA), 1873–1944, French surgeon and biologist, in U.S. 1905–39: Nobel Prize 1912.
Historical Examples

The brilliant carrel has kept tissue cells of animals alive outside of the body for the past three years.
How to Live Irving Fisher and Eugene Fisk

Sir, replied carrel, I can never regard a duel as a bonne fortune.
Old and New Paris, v. 1 Henry Sutherland Edwards

Three days later, carrel and I, with two men from Breuil, tried again.
The Silent Barrier Louis Tracy

carrel made the fire, boiled the water, and prepared our coffee.
Hours of Exercise in the Alps John Tyndall

Near Figuires the legion was compelled to surrender, and carrel became the prisoner of his old general, Damas.
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 5, Slice 4 Various

carrel opened the door for her and ceremoniously bowed her out.
A Bed of Roses W. L. George

The loss of carrel was deeply felt, and his funeral was attended by multitudes of the Parisians.
Paris: With Pen and Pencil David W. Bartlett

I’m personal secretary to Mr. carrel Quire, and it’s really his car.
Mr. Prohack E. Arnold Bennett

I thought of summoning carrel, and pursuing them; but the worthy man sat quietly, and seemed to have had enough of it.
Hours of Exercise in the Alps John Tyndall

It was her foolishness that had transferred her from Mr. carrel Quire to himself.
Mr. Prohack E. Arnold Bennett

noun
a small individual study room or private desk, often in a library, where a student or researcher can work undisturbed
noun
Alexis (əˈlɛksɪs; French alɛksi). 1873–1944, French surgeon and biologist, active in the US (1905–39): developed a method of suturing blood vessels, making the transplantation of arteries and organs possible: Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1912
n.

1590s, “study in a cloister,” from Medieval Latin carula “small study in a cloister,” of unknown origin; perhaps from Latin corolla “little crown, garland,” used in various senses of “ring” (e.g. of Stonehenge: “þis Bretons renged about þe feld, þe karole of þe stones beheld,” 1330); extended to precincts and spaces enclosed by rails, etc. Specific sense of “private cubicle in a library” is from 1919.

Carrel Car·rel (kə-rěl’, kār’əl), Alexis. 1873-1944.

French-born American surgeon and biologist. He won a 1912 Nobel Prize for his work on vascular ligature and grafting of blood vessels and organs.

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