acting as a cause; producing (often followed by of):
a causative agency; an event causative of war.
Grammar. noting causation. The causative form of to fall is to fell. Gothic -jan is a causative suffix in fulljan “to cause to be full; to fill.”.
Grammar. a word, especially a verb, noting causation, as made in He made me eat the apple.
(grammar) relating to a form or class of verbs, such as persuade, that express causation
(often postpositive) and foll by of. producing an effect
the causative form or class of verbs

early 15c. (as a noun), from French causatif, from Latin causativus, from causa (see cause (n.)).


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  • Cause

    a person or thing that acts, happens, or exists in such a way that some specific thing happens as a result; the producer of an effect: You have been the cause of much anxiety. What was the cause of the accident? the reason or motive for some human action: The good news was a cause […]

  • Cause a commotion

    Also, cause a stir. Give rise to a disturbance, raise a fuss. For example, The opening debate was so bitter it caused a commotion in the legislature, or Her entrance always caused a stir.

  • Cause-and-effect

    noting a relationship between actions or events such that one or more are the result of the other or others. Contemporary Examples Historical Examples

  • Cause-celebre

    any controversy that attracts great public attention, as a celebrated legal case or trial. noun (pl) causes célèbres (ˈkɔːz səˈlɛbrəz; -ˈlɛb; ˈkɔːzɪz səˈlɛbrə; -ˈlɛbz; French) (koz selɛbrə) a famous lawsuit, trial, or controversy cause célèbre [(kohz say-leb-ruh, kawz suh-leb-ruh)] A cause or issue, generally political, that arouses public opinion: “The question of the draft was […]

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