[ef-od, ee-fod] /ˈɛf ɒd, ˈi fɒd/

noun, Judaism.
a richly embroidered, apronlike vestment having two shoulder straps and ornamental attachments for securing the breastplate, worn with a waistband by the high priest. Ex. 28:6, 7, 25–28.
(Old Testament) an embroidered vestment believed to resemble an apron with shoulder straps, worn by priests in ancient Israel

Hebrew ephod, from aphad “to put on.”

something girt, a sacred vestment worn originally by the high priest (Ex. 28:4), afterwards by the ordinary priest (1 Sam. 22:18), and characteristic of his office (1 Sam. 2:18, 28; 14:3). It was worn by Samuel, and also by David (2 Sam. 6:14). It was made of fine linen, and consisted of two pieces, which hung from the neck, and covered both the back and front, above the tunic and outer garment (Ex. 28:31). That of the high priest was embroidered with divers colours. The two pieces were joined together over the shoulders (hence in Latin called superhumerale) by clasps or buckles of gold or precious stones, and fastened round the waist by a “curious girdle of gold, blue, purple, and fine twined linen” (28:6-12). The breastplate, with the Urim and Thummim, was attached to the ephod.


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