Every-bit



[bit] /bɪt/

noun
1.
a small piece or quantity of anything:
a bit of string.
2.
a short time:
Wait a bit.
3.
Informal. an amount equivalent to 12½ U.S. cents (used only in even multiples):
two bits; six bits.
4.
an act, performance, or routine:
She’s doing the Camille bit, pretending to be near collapse.
5.
a stereotypic or habitual set of behaviors, attitudes, or styles associated with an individual, role, situation, etc.:
the whole Wall Street bit.
6.
Also called bit part. a very small role, as in a play or motion picture, containing few or no lines.
Compare (def 1).
7.
any small coin:
a threepenny bit.
8.
a Spanish or Mexican silver real worth 12½ cents, formerly current in parts of the U.S.
Idioms
9.
a bit, rather or somewhat; a little:
a bit sleepy.
10.
a bit much, somewhat overdone or beyond tolerability.
11.
bit by bit, by degrees; gradually:
Having saved money bit by bit, they now had enough to buy the land.
12.
do one’s bit, to contribute one’s share to an effort:
They all did their bit during the war.
13.
every bit, quite; just:
every bit as good.
14.
quite a bit, a fairly large amount:
There’s quite a bit of snow on the ground.
[ev-ree] /ˈɛv ri/
adjective
1.
being one of a group or series taken collectively; each:
We go there every day.
2.
all possible; the greatest possible degree of:
every prospect of success.
Idioms
3.
every bit, in every respect; completely:
This is every bit as good as she says it is.
4.
every now and then, on occasion; from time to time:
She bakes her own bread every now and then.
Also, every once in a while, every so often.
5.
every other, every second; every alternate:
milk deliveries every other day.
6.
every which way, in all directions; in disorganized fashion:
I brushed against the table, and the cards fell every which way.
/ˈɛvrɪ/
determiner
1.
each one (of the class specified), without exception: every child knows it
2.
(not used with a negative) the greatest or best possible: every hope of success
3.
each: used before a noun phrase to indicate the recurrent, intermittent, or serial nature of a thing: every third day, every now and then, every so often
4.
(used in comparisons with as) every bit, quite; just; equally: every bit as funny as the other show
5.
every other, each alternate; every second: every other day
6.
every which way

/bɪt/
noun
1.
a small piece, portion, or quantity
2.
a short time or distance
3.
(US & Canadian, informal) the value of an eighth of a dollar: spoken of only in units of two: two bits
4.
any small coin
5.
short for bit part
6.
(informal) way of behaving, esp one intended to create a particular impression: she’s doing the prima donna bit
7.
a bit, rather; somewhat: a bit dreary
8.
a bit of

9.
(Brit, slang) a bit of all right, a bit of crumpet, a bit of stuff, a bit of tail, a sexually attractive woman
10.
bit by bit, gradually
11.
(informal) bit on the side, an extramarital affair
12.
do one’s bit, to make one’s expected contribution
13.
(foll by as) every bit, to the same degree: she was every bit as clever as her brother
14.
not a bit, not a bit of it, not in the slightest; not at all
15.
to bits, completely apart: to fall to bits
/bɪt/
noun
1.
a metal mouthpiece, for controlling a horse on a bridle
2.
anything that restrains or curbs
3.
take the bit in one’s teeth, take the bit between one’s teeth, have the bit in one’s teeth, have the bit between one’s teeth

4.
a cutting or drilling tool, part, or head in a brace, drill, etc
5.
the blade of a woodworking plane
6.
the part of a pair of pincers designed to grasp an object
7.
the copper end of a soldering iron
8.
the part of a key that engages the levers of a lock
verb (transitive) bits, bitting, bitted
9.
to put a bit in the mouth of (a horse)
10.
to restrain; curb
/bɪt/
verb
1.
the past tense and (archaic) past participle of bite
/bɪt/
noun (maths, computing)
1.
a single digit of binary notation, represented either by 0 or by 1
2.
the smallest unit of information, indicating the presence or absence of a single feature
3.
a unit of capacity of a computer, consisting of an element of its physical structure capable of being in either of two states, such as a switch with on and off positions, or a microscopic magnet capable of alignment in two directions
n.

“small piece,” c.1200; related Old English bite “act of biting,” and bita “piece bitten off,” probably are the source of the modern words meaning “boring-piece of a drill” (1590s), “mouthpiece of a horse’s bridle” (mid-14c.), and “a piece bitten off, morsel” (c.1000). All from Proto-Germanic *biton (cf. Old Saxon biti, Old Norse bit, Old Frisian bite, Middle Dutch bete, Old High German bizzo “biting,” German Bissen “a bite, morsel”), from PIE root *bheid- “to split” (see fissure).

Meaning “small piece, fragment” is from c.1600. Sense of “short space of time” is 1650s. Theatrical bit part is from 1909. Money sense in two bits, etc. is originally from Southern U.S. and West Indies, in reference to silver wedges cut or stamped from Spanish dollars (later Mexican reals); transferred to “eighth of a dollar.”

computerese word, 1948 abbreviation coined by U.S. computer pioneer John W. Tukey (1915-2000) of binary digit, probably chosen for its identity with bit (n.1).
v.

past tense of bite.
adj.

early 13c., contraction of Old English æfre ælc “each of a group,” literally “ever each” (Chaucer’s everich), from each with ever added for emphasis, as the word is still felt to need emphasis (e.g. Modern English every last …, every single …, etc.).

Cf. everybody, everything, etc. The word everywhen is attested from 1843 but never caught on; neither did everyhow (1837). Slang phrase every Tom, Dick, and Harry dates from at least 1734, from common English given names.
bit
(bĭt)
The smallest unit of computer memory. A bit holds one of two possible values, either of the binary digits 0 or 1. The term comes from the phrase binary digit. See Note at byte.

The smallest unit of information. One bit corresponds to a “yes” or “no.” Some examples of a bit of information: whether a light is on or off, whether a switch (like a transistor) is on or off, whether a grain of magnetized iron points up or down.

Note: The information in a digital computer is stored in the form of bits.

adjective

Disappointed and resentful •Perhaps the same semantics as mid-1800s bit, ”cheated” (1970s+ Teenagers)

noun

Related Terms

four-bit, six-bit, two-bit
binary digit
built in test

the curb put into the mouths of horses to restrain them. The Hebrew word (metheg) so rendered in Ps. 32:9 is elsewhere translated “bridle” (2 Kings 19:28; Prov. 26:3; Isa. 37:29). Bits were generally made of bronze or iron, but sometimes also of gold or silver. In James 3:3 the Authorized Version translates the Greek word by “bits,” but the Revised Version by “bridles.”

In addition to the idiom beginning with
bit

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Everybody

    [ev-ree-bod-ee, -buhd-ee] /ˈɛv riˌbɒd i, -ˌbʌd i/ pronoun 1. every person. /ˈɛvrɪˌbɒdɪ/ pronoun 1. every person; everyone n. late 14c., from every + body.

  • Everybody and his uncle

    noun phrase Absolutely everyone: Everybody and his uncle came to the party/ Parvin received advice from everybody and his brother/ ”Will enough people see that?” ”Everybody and his dog will see that,” Smith says [1940s+; in earlier versions going back to the 1860s, his cousin or their mothers-in-law could replace uncle]



  • Every cloud has a silver lining

    Every misfortune has its positive aspect. see: silver lining

  • Everyday

    [adjective ev-ree-dey; noun ev-ree-dey] /adjective ˈɛv riˌdeɪ; noun ˈɛv riˈdeɪ/ adjective 1. of or relating to every day; daily: an everyday occurrence. 2. of or for ordinary days, as contrasted with Sundays, holidays, or special occasions: everyday clothes. 3. such as is met with every day; ordinary; commonplace: a placid, everyday scene. noun 4. the […]



Disclaimer: Every-bit definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.