[fawr-ist, for-] /ˈfɔr ɪst, ˈfɒr-/

a large tract of land covered with trees and underbrush; woodland.
the trees on such a tract:
to cut down a forest.
a tract of wooded grounds in England formerly belonging to the sovereign and set apart for game.
a thick cluster of vertical objects:
a forest of church spires.
verb (used with object)
to supply or cover with trees; convert into a forest.
a large wooded area having a thick growth of trees and plants
the trees of such an area
(NZ) an area planted with exotic pines or similar trees Compare bush1 (sense 4)
something resembling a large wooded area, esp in density: a forest of telegraph poles
(law) (formerly) an area of woodland, esp one owned by the sovereign and set apart as a hunting ground with its own laws and officers Compare park (sense 5)
(modifier) of, involving, or living in a forest or forests: a forest glade
(transitive) to create a forest (in); plant with trees

late 13c., “extensive tree-covered district,” especially one set aside for royal hunting and under the protection of the king, from Old French forest “forest, wood, woodland” (Modern French forêt), probably ultimately from Late Latin/Medieval Latin forestem silvam “the outside woods,” a term from the Capitularies of Charlemagne denoting “the royal forest;” perhaps via Old High German forst, from Latin foris “outside” (see foreign), with a sense of “beyond the park,” the park being the main or central fenced woodland.

Another theory traces it through Medieval Latin forestis, originally “forest preserve, game preserve,” from Latin forum in legal sense “court, judgment;” in other words “land subject to a ban” [Buck]. Replaced Old English wudu.

1818 (forested is attested from 1610s), from forest (n.).
A dense growth of trees and underbrush covering a large area. Forests exist in all regions of the Earth except for regions of extreme cold or dryness.

Heb. ya’ar, meaning a dense wood, from its luxuriance. Thus all the great primeval forests of Syria (Eccl. 2:6; Isa. 44:14; Jer. 5:6; Micah 5:8). The most extensive was the trans-Jordanic forest of Ephraim (2 Sam. 18:6, 8; Josh. 17:15, 18), which is probably the same as the wood of Ephratah (Ps. 132:6), some part of the great forest of Gilead. It was in this forest that Absalom was slain by Joab. David withdrew to the forest of Hareth in the mountains of Judah to avoid the fury of Saul (1 Sam. 22:5). We read also of the forest of Bethel (2 Kings 2:23, 24), and of that which the Israelites passed in their pursuit of the Philistines (1 Sam. 14:25), and of the forest of the cedars of Lebanon (1 Kings 4:33; 2 Kings 19:23; Hos. 14:5, 6). “The house of the forest of Lebanon (1 Kings 7:2; 10:17; 2 Chr. 9:16) was probably Solomon’s armoury, and was so called because the wood of its many pillars came from Lebanon, and they had the appearance of a forest. (See BAALBEC.) Heb. horesh, denoting a thicket of trees, underwood, jungle, bushes, or trees entangled, and therefore affording a safe hiding-place. place. This word is rendered “forest” only in 2 Chr. 27:4. It is also rendered “wood”, the “wood” in the “wilderness of Ziph,” in which david concealed himself (1 Sam. 23:15), which lay south-east of Hebron. In Isa. 17:19 this word is in Authorized Version rendered incorrectly “bough.” Heb. pardes, meaning an enclosed garden or plantation. Asaph is (Neh. 2:8) called the “keeper of the king’s forest.” The same Hebrew word is used Eccl. 2:5, where it is rendered in the plural “orchards” (R.V., “parks”), and Cant. 4: 13, rendered “orchard” (R.V. marg., “a paradise”). “The forest of the vintage” (Zech. 11:2, “inaccessible forest,” or R.V. “strong forest”) is probably a figurative allusion to Jerusalem, or the verse may simply point to the devastation of the region referred to. The forest is an image of unfruitfulness as contrasted with a cultivated field (Isa. 29:17; 32:15; Jer. 26:18; Hos. 2:12). Isaiah (10:19, 33, 34) likens the Assyrian host under Sennacherib (q.v.) to the trees of some huge forest, to be suddenly cut down by an unseen stroke.

see: can’t see the forest for the trees


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