Gray



[grey] /greɪ/

adjective, grayer, grayest.
1.
of a color between white and black; having a neutral hue.
2.
dark, dismal, or gloomy:
gray skies.
3.
dull, dreary, or monotonous.
4.
having gray hair; gray-headed.
5.
pertaining to old age; mature.
6.
Informal. pertaining to, involving, or composed of older persons:
gray households.
7.
old or ancient.
8.
indeterminate and intermediate in character:
The tax audit concentrated on deductions in the gray area between purely personal and purely business expenses.
noun
9.
any achromatic color; any color with zero chroma, intermediate between white and black.
10.
something of this color.
11.
gray material or clothing:
to dress in gray.
12.
an unbleached and undyed condition.
13.
(often initial capital letter) a member of the Confederate army in the American Civil War or the army itself.
Compare (def 5).
14.
a horse of a gray color.
15.
a horse that appears white but is not an albino.
verb (used with or without object)
16.
to make or become gray.
[grey] /greɪ/
noun, Physics.
1.
the standard unit of absorbed dose of radiation (such as x-rays) in the (SI), equal to the amount of ionizing radiation absorbed when the energy imparted to matter is 1 J/kg (one joule per kilogram).
Abbreviation: Gy.
[grey] /greɪ/
noun
1.
Asa
[ey-suh] /ˈeɪ sə/ (Show IPA), 1810–88, U.S. botanist.
2.
Robert, 1755–1806, U.S. explorer and sea captain: discovered the Columbia River.
3.
Thomas, 1716–71, English poet.
/ɡreɪ/
adjective, noun, verb
1.
a variant spelling (now esp US) of grey
/ɡreɪ/
noun
1.
the derived SI unit of absorbed ionizing radiation dose or kerma equivalent to an absorption per unit mass of one joule per kilogram of irradiated material. 1 gray is equivalent to 100 rads Gy
/ɡreɪ/
noun
1.
Thomas. 1716–71, English poet, best known for his Elegy written in a Country Churchyard (1751)
adj.

Old English græg (Mercian grei), from Proto-Germanic *grisja- “gray” (cf. Old Norse grar, Old Frisian gre, Middle Dutch gra, Dutch graw, Old High German grao, German grau), with no certain cognates outside Germanic. French gris, Spanish gris, Italian grigio, Medieval Latin griseus are Germanic loan-words.

The distinction between British grey and U.S. gray developed 20c. The noun is c.1200, from the adjective. Gray as figurative for “Southern troops in the U.S. Civil War” is first recorded 1863, in reference to their uniform color. Expression the gray mare is the better horse in reference to households ruled by wives is recorded from 1540s. The verb is 1610s (with an isolated instance from late 14c.). Related: Grayed; graying.

gray (grā)
n.
Abbr. Gy
A unit for a specific absorbed dose of radiation equal to 100 rads.

Gray (grā), Henry. 1825?-1861.

British anatomist whose work Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical (1858), known as Gray’s Anatomy, remains a standard text.
gray
(grā)
The SI derived unit used to measure the energy absorbed by a substance per unit weight of the substance when exposed to radiation. One gray is equal to one joule per kilogram, or 100 rads. The gray is named after British physicist Louis Harold Gray (1905-1965).

A parser generator written in Forth by Martin Anton Ertl anton@mips.complang.tuwien.ac.at. Gray takes grammars in an extended BNF and produces executable Forth code for recursive descent parsers. There is no special support for error handling. Version 3 runs under Tile Forth Release 2 by Mikael Patel.
(1992-05-22)

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Gray area

    noun an undefined situation or subject that does not seem to conform to known categories or rules; an intermediate area or topic that is not clearly defined Indeterminate territory, undefined position, neither here nor there. For example, There’s a large gray area between what is legal and what is not. This term, which uses gray […]

  • Grayback

    [grey-bak] /ˈgreɪˌbæk/ noun 1. any of various marine and aquatic animals that are dark above and light-colored or white below, as the , the alewife, certain whitefish, and certain sandpipers. 2. Informal. a Confederate soldier.



  • Graybar land

    jargon The place you go while you’re staring at a computer that’s processing something very slowly (while you watch the grey bar creep across the screen). “I was in graybar land for hours, waiting for that CAD rendering”. (1997-04-17)

  • Gray bar motel

    noun phrase Jail; prison: These days, the Gray Bar Motel is a synonym for ”the bucket,” which means jail [1990s+ Los Angeles police; said to have been the name of the Lincoln Heights police station; a place displaying gray prison bars; earlier terms like Graybar Hotel and Graystone College are found by the 1930s]



Disclaimer: Gray definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.