Hermes



[hur-meez] /ˈhɜr miz/

noun
1.
the ancient Greek herald and messenger of the gods and the god of roads, commerce, invention, cunning, and theft.
Compare (def 3).
2.
Astronomy. a small asteroid that in 1937 approached within 485,000 miles (780,000 km) of the earth, the closest approach of an asteroid ever observed.
/ˈhɜːmiːz/
noun
1.
(Greek myth) the messenger and herald of the gods; the divinity of commerce, cunning, theft, travellers, and rascals. He was represented as wearing winged sandals Roman counterpart Mercury
/ˈhɜːmiːz/
noun
1.
a small asteroid some 800 m in diameter that passed within 670 000 kilometres of the earth in 1937, and is now lost

Olympian messenger and god of commerce, son of Zeus and Maia, identified by the Romans with their Mercury, from Greek Hermes, of unknown origin.
Hermes

[Roman name Mercury]

The messenger god of classical mythology. He traveled with great swiftness, aided by the wings he wore on his sandals and his cap. Hermes was a son of Zeus and the father of Pan.

Note: The caduceus, the wand of Hermes, is the traditional symbol of physicians. It has wings at the top and serpents twined about the staff.

language
An experimental, very high level, integrated language and system from the IBM Watson Research Centre, produced in June 1990. It is designed for implementation of large systems and distributed applications, as well as for general-purpose programming. It is an imperative language, strongly typed and is a process-oriented successor to NIL.
Hermes hides distribution and heterogeneity from the programmer. The programmer sees a single abstract machine containing processes that communicate using calls or sends. The compiler, not the programmer, deals with the complexity of data structure layout, local and remote communication, and interaction with the operating system. As a result, Hermes programs are portable and easy to write. Because the programming paradigm is simple and high level, there are many opportunities for optimisation which are not present in languages which give the programmer more direct control over the machine.
Hermes features threads, relational tablesHermes is, typestate checking, capability-based access and dynamic configuration.
Version 0.8alpha patchlevel 01 runs on RS/6000, Sun-4, NeXT, IBM-RT/BSD4.3 and includes a bytecode compiler, a bytecode->C compiler and run-time support.
0.7alpha for Unix (ftp://software.watson.ibm.com/pub/hermes).
E-mail: , Andy Lowry lowry@watson.ibm.com.
Usenet newsgroup: news:comp.lang.hermes.
[“Hermes: A Language for Distributed Computing”. Strom, Bacon, Goldberg, Lowry, Yellin, Yemini. Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. 1991. ISBN: O-13-389537-8].
(1992-03-22)

Mercury, a Roman Christian (Rom. 16:14).

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  • Hermes-trismegistus

    noun 1. a name variously ascribed by Neoplatonists and others to an Egyptian priest or to the Egyptian god Thoth, to some extent identified with the Grecian Hermes: various mystical, religious, philosophical, astrological, and alchemical writings were ascribed to him. /ˌtrɪsməˈdʒɪstəs/ noun 1. a Greek name for the Egyptian god Thoth, credited with various works […]

  • Hermetic

    [hur-met-ik] /hɜrˈmɛt ɪk/ adjective 1. made airtight by fusion or sealing. 2. not affected by outward influence or power; isolated. 3. (sometimes initial capital letter) of, relating to, or characteristic of occult science, especially alchemy. 4. (initial capital letter) of or relating to Hermes Trismegistus or the writings ascribed to him. /hɜːˈmɛtɪk/ adjective 1. sealed […]



  • Hermetical

    [hur-met-ik] /hɜrˈmɛt ɪk/ adjective 1. made airtight by fusion or sealing. 2. not affected by outward influence or power; isolated. 3. (sometimes initial capital letter) of, relating to, or characteristic of occult science, especially alchemy. 4. (initial capital letter) of or relating to Hermes Trismegistus or the writings ascribed to him. /hɜːˈmɛtɪk/ adjective 1. sealed […]

  • Hermetically

    [hur-met-ik-lee] /hɜrˈmɛt ɪk li/ adverb 1. so as to be airtight: hermetically sealed. adv. c.1600; see hermetic.



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