Jibbed



[jib] /dʒɪb/ Nautical

verb (used with or without object), jibbed, jibbing, noun
1.
1 .
[jib] /dʒɪb/ Chiefly British
verb (used without object), jibbed, jibbing.
1.
to move restively sidewise or backward instead of forward, as an animal in harness; balk.
2.
to balk at doing something; defer action; procrastinate.
noun
3.
a horse or other animal that jibs.
[jahyb] /dʒaɪb/ Nautical
verb (used without object), jibed, jibing.
1.
to shift from one side to the other when running before the wind, as a fore-and-aft sail or its boom.
2.
to alter course so that a fore-and-aft sail shifts in this manner.
verb (used with object), jibed, jibing.
3.
to cause to jibe.
noun
4.
the act of jibing.
/dʒɪb/
noun
1.
(nautical) any triangular sail set forward of the foremast of a vessel
2.
cut of someone’s jib, someone’s manner, behaviour, style, etc
3.
(obsolete)

/dʒɪb/
verb (intransitive) (mainly Brit) jibs, jibbing, jibbed
1.
(often foll by at) to be reluctant (to); hold back (from); balk (at)
2.
(of an animal) to stop short and refuse to go forwards: the horse jibbed at the jump
3.
(nautical) variant of gybe
/dʒɪb/
noun
1.
the projecting arm of a crane or the boom of a derrick, esp one that is pivoted to enable it to be raised or lowered
/dʒɪb/
noun
1.
(often pl) (South Wales, dialect) a contortion of the face; a face: stop making jibs
/dʒaɪb/
verb, noun
1.
(nautical) variants of gybe
/dʒaɪb/
verb
1.
a variant spelling of gibe1
/dʒaɪb/
verb
1.
(intransitive) (informal) to agree; accord; harmonize
n.

“foresail of a ship,” 1660s, gibb, of uncertain origin, perhaps related to gibbet, from notion of a sail “hanging” from a masthead [Barnhart, OED]. Or perhaps from jib (v.) “shift a sail or boom” (1690s), from Dutch gijben, apparently related to gijk “boom or spar of a sailing ship.” Said to indicate a ship’s character to an observant sailor as a strange vessel approaches at sea; also nautical slang for “face,” hence cut of (one’s) jib “personal appearance” (1821).
v.

“agree, fit,” 1813, of unknown origin, perhaps a figurative extension of earlier jib, gybe (v.) “shift a sail or boom” (see jib). OED, however, suggests a phonetic variant of chime, as if meaning “to chime in with, to be in harmony.” Related: Jibed; jibes; jibing.
n.

1560s, perhaps from Middle French giber “to handle roughly,” or an alteration of gaber “to mock.”
see: cut of one’s jib

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Jibber

    [jib] /dʒɪb/ Chiefly British verb (used without object), jibbed, jibbing. 1. to move restively sidewise or backward instead of forward, as an animal in harness; balk. 2. to balk at doing something; defer action; procrastinate. noun 3. a horse or other animal that jibs. /dʒɪb/ noun 1. (nautical) any triangular sail set forward of the […]

  • Jibber-jabber

    v. 1728, “to talk gibberish,” reduplication of jabber (q.v.). Related: Jibber-jabbering. As a noun, from 1813. verb To talk nonsense; jabber: Time for Congress to quit jibber-jabbering/ We just jibberjabbered these things all day



  • Jibbing

    [jib] /dʒɪb/ Nautical verb (used with or without object), jibbed, jibbing, noun 1. 1 . [jib] /dʒɪb/ Chiefly British verb (used without object), jibbed, jibbing. 1. to move restively sidewise or backward instead of forward, as an animal in harness; balk. 2. to balk at doing something; defer action; procrastinate. noun 3. a horse or […]

  • Jibbons

    /ˈdʒɪbənz/ plural noun 1. (Southwest English, dialect) spring onions



Disclaimer: Jibbed definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.