Knees



[nee] /ni/

noun
1.
Anatomy. the joint of the leg that allows for movement between the femur and tibia and is protected by the patella; the central area of the leg between the thigh and the lower leg.
2.
Zoology. the corresponding joint or region in the hind leg of a quadruped; stifle.
3.
a joint or region likened to this but not anatomically homologous with it, as the tarsal joint of a bird, the carpal joint in the forelimb of the horse or cow, etc.
4.
the part of a garment covering the knee.
5.
something resembling a bent knee, especially a rigid or braced angle between two framing members.
6.
Also called hip, shoulder. Furniture. the inward curve toward the top of a cabriole leg.
7.
Building Trades.

8.
Also called kneeler. a stone cut to follow a sharp return angle.
verb (used with object), kneed, kneeing.
9.
to strike or touch with the knee.
10.
to secure (a structure, as a bent) with a knee.
verb (used without object), kneed, kneeing.
11.
Obsolete. to go down on the knees; kneel.
Idioms
12.
bring someone to his / her knees, to force someone into submission or compliance.
13.
cut (someone) off at the knees, to squelch or humiliate (a person) suddenly and thoroughly:
The speaker cut the heckler off at the knees.
14.
on one’s / its knees,

/niː/
noun
1.
the joint of the human leg connecting the tibia and fibula with the femur and protected in front by the patella Technical name genu, related adjective genicular
2.

3.
a corresponding or similar part in other vertebrates
4.
the part of a garment that covers the knee
5.
the upper surface of a seated person’s thigh: the child sat on her mother’s knee
6.
anything resembling a knee in action, such as a device pivoted to allow one member angular movement in relation to another
7.
anything resembling a knee in shape, such as an angular bend in a pipe
8.
any of the hollow rounded protuberances that project upwards from the roots of the swamp cypress: thought to aid respiration in waterlogged soil
9.
bend the knee, bow the knee, to kneel or submit
10.
bring someone to his knees, to force someone into submission
11.
bring something to its knees, to cause something to be in a weakened or impoverished state
verb knees, kneeing, kneed
12.
(transitive) to strike, nudge, or push with the knee
n.

Old English cneo, cneow “knee,” from Proto-Germanic *knewam (cf. Old Norse kne, Old Saxon kneo, Old Frisian kni, Middle Dutch cnie, Dutch knie, Old High German kniu, German Knie, Gothic kniu), from PIE root *g(e)neu- (cf. Sanskrit janu, Avestan znum, Hittite genu “knee;” Greek gony “knee,” gonia “corner, angle;” Latin genu “knee”). Knee-slapper “funny joke” is from 1955.
v.

early 13c., “to bend the knee, kneel,” from Old English cneowian, from cneow (see knee (n.)). The meaning “to strike with the knee” is first recorded 1892. Related: Kneed; kneeing.

knee (nē)
n.

Related Terms

bees knees, cut oneself off at the knees, cut someone off at the knees, get taken off at the knees
In addition to the idiom beginning with
knee

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  • Kneesies

    [nee-zeez] /ˈni ziz/ Idioms 1. play kneesies, Informal. to rub knees with another person, especially surreptitiously and in an amorous or sexually provocative manner, as while seated at a table. noun Clandestine amorous friction of the knees: We got back to the table and played kneesies while we talked [1951+; modeled on footsie]

  • Knee-slapper

    [nee-slap-er] /ˈniˌslæp ər/ noun, Informal. 1. a joke evoking boisterous hilarity. noun an extremely funny joke noun Something very funny, esp a joke; boffola: That’s a knee-slapper/ If she ever told a kneeslapper, I wasn’t there (1966+)



  • Knee-socks

    [nee-soks] /ˈniˌsɒks/ plural noun 1. socks reaching to just below the knees.

  • Knee spavin

    noun 1. (vet science) chronic inflammation of the carpal joint of a horse



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