Lobbying



[lob-ee] /ˈlɒb i/

noun, plural lobbies.
1.
an entrance hall, corridor, or vestibule, as in a public building, often serving as an anteroom; foyer.
2.
a large public room or hall adjacent to a legislative chamber.
3.
a group of persons who work or conduct a campaign to influence members of a legislature to vote according to the group’s special interest.
verb (used without object), lobbied, lobbying.
4.
to solicit or try to influence the votes of members of a legislative body.
verb (used with object), lobbied, lobbying.
5.
to try to influence the actions of (public officials, especially legislators).
6.
to urge or procure the passage of (a bill), by lobbying.
/ˈlɒbɪ/
noun (pl) -bies
1.
a room or corridor used as an entrance hall, vestibule, etc
2.
(mainly Brit) a hall in a legislative building used for meetings between the legislators and members of the public
3.
(mainly Brit) Also called division lobby. one of two corridors in a legislative building in which members vote
4.
a group of persons who attempt to influence legislators on behalf of a particular interest
verb -bies, -bying, -bied
5.
to attempt to influence (legislators, etc) in the formulation of policy
6.
(intransitive) to act in the manner of a lobbyist
7.
(transitive) to apply pressure or influence for the passage of (a bill, etc)
n.

1530s, “cloister, covered walk,” from Medieval Latin laubia, lobia “covered walk in a monastery,” from a Germanic source (cf. Old High German louba “hall, roof;” see lodge (n.)). Meaning “large entrance hall in a public building” is from 1590s. Political sense of “those who seek to influence legislation” is attested by 1790s in American English, in reference to the custom of influence-seekers gathering in large entrance-halls outside legislative chambers.
v.

“seek to influence legislation,” 1826, American English, from lobby (n.). Related: Lobbied; lobbying.

A group whose members share certain goals and work to bring about the passage, modification, or defeat of laws that affect these goals. Lobbies (also called interest groups or pressure groups) can be long-standing (such as minority groups struggling to have their civil rights guaranteed) or ad hoc (such as a community threatened by proposed construction of a nuclear power plant). Lobbies may use grassroots methods, such as local rallies and campaigns, to build support for their cause and often employ professional lobbyists, who testify before congressional committees and approach policymakers in all government branches. Powerful lobbies, such as the AFL-CIO and the American Legion, with millions of members, have succeeded in establishing influence in Washington, D.C.

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