Manifest



[man-uh-fest] /ˈmæn əˌfɛst/

adjective
1.
readily perceived by the eye or the understanding; evident; obvious; apparent; plain:
a manifest error.
2.
Psychoanalysis. of or relating to conscious feelings, ideas, and impulses that contain repressed psychic material:
the manifest content of a dream as opposed to the latent content that it conceals.
verb (used with object)
3.
to make clear or evident to the eye or the understanding; show plainly:
He manifested his approval with a hearty laugh.
4.
to prove; put beyond doubt or question:
The evidence manifests the guilt of the defendant.
5.
to record in a ship’s manifest.
noun
6.
a list of the cargo carried by a ship, made for the use of various agents and officials at the ports of destination.
7.
a list or invoice of goods transported by truck or train.
8.
a list of the cargo or passengers carried on an airplane.
/ˈmænɪˌfɛst/
adjective
1.
easily noticed or perceived; obvious; plain
2.
(psychoanal) of or relating to the ostensible elements of a dream: manifest content Compare latent (sense 5)
verb
3.
(transitive) to show plainly; reveal or display: to manifest great emotion
4.
(transitive) to prove beyond doubt
5.
(intransitive) (of a disembodied spirit) to appear in visible form
6.
(transitive) to list in a ship’s manifest
noun
7.
a customs document containing particulars of a ship, its cargo, and its destination
8.

adj.

late 14c., “clearly revealed,” from Old French manifest “evident, palpable,” (12c.), or directly from Latin manifestus “plainly apprehensible, clear, apparent, evident;” of offenses, “proved by direct evidence;” of offenders, “caught in the act,” probably from manus “hand” (see manual) + -festus “struck” (cf. second element of infest).

Other nations have tried to check … the fulfillment of our manifest destiny to overspread the Continent allotted by Providence for the free development of our yearly multiplying millions. [John O’Sullivan (1813-1895), “U.S. Magazine & Democratic Review,” July 1845]

The phrase apparently is O’Sullivan’s coinage; the notion is as old as the republic.

v.

late 14c., “to spread” (one’s fame), “to show plainly,” from manifest (adj.) or else from Latin manifestare “to discover, disclose, betray” (see manifest (adj.)). Meaning “to display by actions” is from 1560s; reflective sense, of diseases, etc., “to reveal as in operation” is from 1808. Related: Manifested; manifesting.
n.

“ship’s cargo,” 1706; see manifest (adj.). Earlier, “a public declaration” (c.1600; cf. manifesto), from French manifeste, verbal noun from manifester. Earlier still in English as “a manifestation” (1560s).

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    [man-uh-fes-tuh nt] /ˌmæn əˈfɛs tənt/ noun 1. a person who initiates or participates in a public demonstration; demonstrator.

  • Manifestation

    [man-uh-fuh-stey-shuh n, -fe-] /ˌmæn ə fəˈsteɪ ʃən, -fɛ-/ noun 1. an act of . 2. the state of being . 3. outward or perceptible indication; materialization: At first there was no manifestation of the disease. 4. a public demonstration, as for political effect. 5. Spiritualism. a materialization. /ˌmænɪfɛˈsteɪʃən/ noun 1. the act of demonstrating; display: […]



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  • Manifest content

    manifest content man·i·fest content (mān’ə-fěst’) n. The content of a dream, fantasy, or thought as it is remembered and reported in psychoanalysis.



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