Mocker



[mok] /mɒk/

verb (used with object)
1.
to attack or treat with ridicule, contempt, or derision.
2.
to ridicule by mimicry of action or speech; mimic derisively.
3.
to mimic, imitate, or counterfeit.
4.
to challenge; defy:
His actions mock convention.
5.
to deceive, delude, or disappoint.
verb (used without object)
6.
to use ridicule or derision; scoff; jeer (often followed by at).
noun
7.
a contemptuous or derisive imitative action or speech; mockery or derision.
8.
something mocked or derided; an object of derision.
9.
an imitation; counterfeit; fake.
10.
Shipbuilding.

adjective
11.
feigned; not real; sham:
a mock battle.
Verb phrases
12.
mock up, to build a mock-up of.
/ˈmɒkə/
noun
1.
clothing
verb (transitive)
2.
all mockered up, dressed up
/mɒk/
verb
1.
when intr, often foll by at. to behave with scorn or contempt (towards); show ridicule (for)
2.
(transitive) to imitate, esp in fun; mimic
3.
(transitive) to deceive, disappoint, or delude
4.
(transitive) to defy or frustrate: the team mocked the visitors’ attempt to score
noun
5.
the act of mocking
6.
a person or thing mocked
7.
a counterfeit; imitation
8.
(often pl) (informal) (in England and Wales) the school examinations taken as practice before public examinations
adjective (prenominal)
9.
sham or counterfeit
10.
serving as an imitation or substitute, esp for practice purposes: a mock battle, mock finals
n.

late 15c., agent noun from mock (v.).
v.

early 15c., “to deceive;” mid-15c. “make fun of,” from Old French mocquer “deride, jeer,” of unknown origin, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *muccare “to blow the nose” (as a derisive gesture), from Latin mucus; or possibly from Middle Dutch mocken “to mumble” or Middle Low German mucken “grumble.” Or perhaps simply imitative of such speech. Related: Mocked; mocking; mockingly. Replaced Old English bysmerian. Sense of “imitating,” as in mockingbird and mock turtle (1763), is from notion of derisive imitation.
adj.

1540s, from mock, verb and noun. Mock-heroic is attested from 1711; mock-turtle “calf’s head dressed to resemble a turtle,” is from 1763; as a kind of soup from 1783.
n.

“derisive action or speech,” early 15c., from mock (v.).

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  • Mockers

    [mok] /mɒk/ verb (used with object) 1. to attack or treat with ridicule, contempt, or derision. 2. to ridicule by mimicry of action or speech; mimic derisively. 3. to mimic, imitate, or counterfeit. 4. to challenge; defy: His actions mock convention. 5. to deceive, delude, or disappoint. verb (used without object) 6. to use ridicule […]

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