Dictionary: A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z

Porter



[pawr-ter, pohr-] /ˈpɔr tər, ˈpoʊr-/

noun
1.
a person hired to carry burdens or baggage, as at a railroad station or a hotel.
2.
a person who does cleaning and maintenance work in a building, factory, store, etc.
3.
an attendant in a railroad parlor car or sleeping car.
[pawr-ter, pohr-] /ˈpɔr tər, ˈpoʊr-/
noun
1.
a person who has charge of a door or gate; doorkeeper.
2.
Roman Catholic Church. (def 1).
[pawr-ter, pohr-] /ˈpɔr tər, ˈpoʊr-/
noun
1.
a heavy, dark-brown ale made with malt browned by drying at a high temperature.
[pawr-ter, pohr-] /ˈpɔr tər, ˈpoʊr-/
noun
1.
Cole, 1893–1964, U.S. composer.
2.
David, 1780–1843, U.S. naval officer.
3.
his son, David Dixon
[dik-suh n] /ˈdɪk sən/ (Show IPA), 1813–91, Union naval officer in the Civil War.
4.
Edwin Stanton, 1870–1941, U.S. film director.
5.
Gene (Gene Stratton Porter) 1868–1924, U.S. novelist.
6.
Sir George, 1920–2002, British chemist: Nobel prize 1967.
7.
Katherine Anne, 1890–1980, U.S. writer.
8.
Noah, 1811–92, U.S. educator, writer, and lexicographer.
9.
Rodney Robert, 1917–85, British biochemist: Nobel Prize in medicine 1972.
10.
William Sydney (“O. Henry”) 1862–1910, U.S. short-story writer.
11.
a male given name.
[pawrt, pohrt] /pɔrt, poʊrt/
noun
1.
the left-hand side of a vessel or aircraft, facing forward.
adjective
2.
pertaining to or designating port.
3.
located on the left side of a vessel or aircraft.
verb (used with or without object)
4.
to turn or shift to the port, or left, side.
/ˈpɔːtə/
noun
1.
a person employed to carry luggage, parcels, supplies, etc, esp at a railway station or hotel
2.
(in hospitals) a person employed to move patients from place to place
3.
(US & Canadian) a railway employee who waits on passengers, esp in a sleeper
4.
(E African) a manual labourer
/ˈpɔːtə/
noun
1.
(mainly Brit) a person in charge of a gate or door; doorman or gatekeeper
2.
a person employed by a university or college as a caretaker and doorkeeper who also answers enquiries
3.
a person in charge of the maintenance of a building, esp a block of flats
4.
(RC Church) Also called ostiary. a person ordained to what was formerly the lowest in rank of the minor orders
/ˈpɔːtə/
noun
1.
(Brit) a dark sweet ale brewed from black malt
/ˈpɔːtə/
noun
1.
Cole. 1893–1964, US composer and lyricist of musical comedies. His most popular songs include Night and Day and Let’s do It
2.
George, Baron Porter of Luddenham. 1920–2002, British chemist, who shared a Nobel prize for chemistry in 1967 for his work on flash photolysis
3.
Katherine Anne. 1890–1980, US short-story writer and novelist. Her best-known collections of stories are Flowering Judas (1930) and Pale Horse, Pale Rider (1939)
4.
Rodney Robert. 1917–85, British biochemist: shared the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1972 for determining the structure of an antibody
5.
William Sidney. original name of O. Henry
/pɔːt/
noun
1.
a town or place alongside navigable water with facilities for the loading and unloading of ships
2.
See port of entry
/pɔːt/
noun
1.
Also called (formerly) larboard

verb
2.
to turn or be turned towards the port
/pɔːt/
noun
1.
a sweet fortified dessert wine
/pɔːt/
noun
1.
(nautical)

2.
a small opening in a wall, armoured vehicle, etc, for firing through
3.
an aperture, esp one controlled by a valve, by which fluid enters or leaves the cylinder head of an engine, compressor, etc
4.
(electronics) a logic circuit for the input and ouput of data
5.
(mainly Scot) a gate or portal in a town or fortress
/pɔːt/
verb
1.
(transitive) to carry (a rifle, etc) in a position diagonally across the body with the muzzle near the left shoulder
noun
2.
this position
/pɔːt/
verb
1.
(transitive) (computing) to change (programs) from one system to another
/pɔːt/
noun
1.
(Austral) (esp in Queensland) a suitcase or school case
n.

“person who carries,” late 14c. (mid-13c. as a surname), from Anglo-French portour, Old French porteor “porter, bearer; reporter” (12c.), from Late Latin portatorem (nominative portator) “carrier, one who carries,” from past participle stem of Latin portare “to carry” (see port (n.1)).

“doorkeeper, janitor,” mid-13c. (late 12c. as a surname), from Anglo-French portour, Old French portier “gatekeeper” (12c.), from Late Latin portarius “gatekeeper,” from Latin porta “gate” (see port (n.2)).

type of dark beer, 1734, short for porter’s ale (1721), from porter (n.1), because the beer was made for or preferred by porters and other laborers, being cheap and strong.
n.

“harbor,” Old English port “harbor, haven,” reinforced by Old French port “harbor, port; mountain pass;” Old English and Old French words both from Latin portus “port, harbor,” originally “entrance, passage,” figuratively “place of refuge, assylum,” from PIE *prtu- “a going, a passage,” from root *per- (2) “to lead, pass over” (cf. Sanskrit parayati “carries over;” Greek poros “journey, passage, way,” peirein “to pierce, run through;” Latin porta “gate, door,” portare “passage,” peritus “experienced;” Avestan peretush “passage, ford, bridge;” Armenian hordan “go forward;” Welsh rhyd “ford;” Old Church Slavonic pariti “to fly;” Old English faran “to go, journey,” Old Norse fjörðr “inlet, estuary”).

Meaning “left side of a ship” (looking forward from the stern) is attested from 1540s, from notion of “the side facing the harbor” (when a ship is docked). It replaced larboard in common usage to avoid confusion with starboard; officially so by Admiralty order of 1844 and U.S. Navy Department notice of 1846. Figurative sense “place of refuge” is attested from early 15c.; phrase any port in a storm first recorded 1749. A port of call (1810) is one paid a scheduled visit by a ship.

“gateway,” Old English port “portal, door, gate, entrance,” from Old French porte “gate, entrance,” from Latin porta “city gate, gate; door, entrance,” from PIE root *per- (see port (n.1)). Specific meaning “porthole, opening in the side of a ship” is attested from c.1300.

“bearing, mien,” c.1300, from Old French port, from porter “to carry,” from Latin portare (see port (n.1)).

type of sweet dark-red wine, 1690s, shortened from Oporto, city in northwest Portugal from which the wine originally was shipped to England; from O Porto “the port;” (see port (n.1)).
v.

“to carry,” from Middle French porter, from Latin portare “to carry” (see port (n.1)). Related: Ported; porting.

Porter Por·ter (pôr’tər), Rodney Robert. Born 1917.

British biochemist. He shared a 1972 Nobel Prize for his research on the chemical structure and nature of antibodies.
Porter
(pôr’tər)
British biochemist who shared with George Edelman the 1972 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine for their study of the chemical structure of antibodies.
port
(pôrt)

a gate-keeper (2 Sam. 18:26; 2 Kings 7:10; 1 Chr. 9:21; 2 Chr. 8:14). Of the Levites, 4,000 were appointed as porters by David (1 Chr. 23:5), who were arranged according to their families (26:1-19) to take charge of the doors and gates of the temple. They were sometimes employed as musicians (1 Chr. 15:18).

see: any port in a storm

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Porterage

    [pawr-ter-ij, pohr-] /ˈpɔr tər ɪdʒ, ˈpoʊr-/ noun 1. the work of a or carrier. 2. the charge for such work. /ˈpɔːtərɪdʒ/ noun 1. the work of carrying supplies, goods, etc, done by porters 2. the charge made for this

  • Porter-chair

    noun, English Furniture. 1. a chair of the 18th century having deep wings continued to form an arch over the seat.



  • Portered

    /ˈpɔːtəd/ adjective 1. (of an apartment block) serviced by a caretaker

  • Porteress

    [pawr-ter-is, pohr-] /ˈpɔr tər ɪs, ˈpoʊr-/ noun 1. .



Disclaimer: Porter definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.