Raver



[reyv] /reɪv/

verb (used without object), raved, raving.
1.
to talk wildly, as in delirium.
2.
to talk or write with extravagant enthusiasm:
She raved about her trip to Europe.
3.
(of wind, water, storms, etc.) to make a wild or furious sound; rage.
verb (used with object), raved, raving.
4.
to utter as if in madness.
noun
5.
an act of raving.
6.
an extravagantly enthusiastic appraisal or review of something.
7.
Chiefly British Slang. a boisterous party, especially a dance.
adjective
8.
extravagantly flattering or enthusiastic:
rave reviews of a new play.
/ˈreɪvə/
noun
1.
(Brit) a person who leads a wild or uninhibited social life
2.
a person who enjoys rave music, esp one who frequents raves
/reɪv/
verb
1.
to utter (something) in a wild or incoherent manner, as when mad or delirious
2.
(intransitive) to speak in an angry uncontrolled manner
3.
(intransitive) (of the sea, wind, etc) to rage or roar
4.
(intransitive; foll by over or about) (informal) to write or speak (about) with great enthusiasm
5.
(intransitive) (Brit, slang) to enjoy oneself wildly or uninhibitedly
noun
6.
(informal)

7.
(Brit, slang)

8.
(Brit, slang) a fad or fashion: the latest rave
9.
a name given to various types of dance music, such as techno, that feature fast electronic rhythm
/reɪv/
noun
1.
a vertical sidepiece on a wagon
n.

c.1400, “madman,” agent noun from rave (v.). Meaning “attendee at a mass party” is from 1991. In Old French, the noun resveor meant “vagabond, night-prowler.”
v.

early 14c., “to show signs of madness or delirium,” from Old French raver, variant of resver “to dream; wander here and there, prowl; behave madly, be crazy,” of unknown origin (cf. reverie). The identical (in form) verb meaning “to wander, stray, rove” first appeared c.1300 in Scottish and northern dialect, and is probably from an unrelated Scandinavian word (cf. Icelandic rafa). Sense of “talk enthusiastically about” first recorded 1704. Related: Raved; raving.
n.

“act of raving,” 1590s, from rave (v.). Meaning “temporary popular enthusiasm” is from 1902; that of “highly flattering review” is from 1926. Sense of “rowdy party” is from 1960; rave-up was British slang for “wild party” from 1940; specific modern sense of “mass party with loud, fast electronic music and often psychedelic drugs” is from 1989.

noun

A person who has a wild time, especially sexually (1959+)

modifier

: rave notices

noun

verb

To commend or applaud enthusiastically: He’s raving over this new book (1816+)

Related Terms

fave

[rave meant ”party” in British slang by 1960]
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