Temperance



moderation or self-restraint in action, statement, etc.; self-control.
habitual moderation in the indulgence of a natural appetite or passion, especially in the use of alcoholic liquors.
total abstinence from alcoholic liquors.
Contemporary Examples

Resistance to “The Star-Spangled Banner” also flared among blacks, pacifists, and advocates of temperance.
Star-Spangled Confederates: How Southern Sympathizers Decided Our National Anthem Jefferson Morley July 3, 2013

More importantly, Longworth viewed wine as a critical piece of the temperance movement.
America’s First Great Wine…Made in 1842 Jordan Salcito November 22, 2013

Historical Examples

Evangelistic efforts, the relief of the sick and poor, and the inculcation of temperance are zealously carried on.
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 9, Slice 4 Various

Certainly, he said, that is the true account of temperance whether in the State or individual.
The Republic Plato

For the courage and temperance of other men, if you will consider them, are really a contradiction.
Phaedo Plato

Nothing is said of the pre-existence of ideas of justice, temperance, and the like.
Meno Plato

Our temperance brethren, particularly our worthy Washingtonians, will do well to bear this in mind.
A Disquisition on the Evils of Using Tobacco Orin Fowler

For I say that justice, temperance, and the like, are all of them parts of virtue as well as courage.
Laches Plato

As to its extent, it should be such as may enable the inhabitants to live at their ease with freedom and temperance.
Politics Aristotle

The answer is that temperance is the knowledge of what a man knows and of what he does not know.
Charmides Plato

noun
restraint or moderation, esp in yielding to one’s appetites or desires
abstinence from alcoholic drink
n.

mid-14c., “self-restraint, moderation,” from Anglo-French temperaunce (mid-13c.), from Latin temperantia “moderation,” from temperans, present participle of temperare “to moderate” (see temper). Latin temperantia was used by Cicero to translate Greek sophrosyne “moderation.” In English, temperance was used to render Latin continentia or abstinentia, specifically in reference to drinking alcohol and eating; hence by early 1800s it came to mean “abstinence from alcoholic drink.”

temperance tem·per·ance (těm’pər-əns, těm’prəns)
n.

Moderation and self-restraint, as in behavior or expression.

Restraint in the use of or abstinence from alcoholic liquors.

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