windmeal



the correct spelling of the word ‘windmill’, according to it’s typical pr-nunciation.

this variant of the word is commonly used by those of the pacific northwest and puget sound regions, whose accents are considered to be “very neutral” to most americans and canadians.

the northwest’s accent is one of the closest living accents to conservative general american english.

it lacks the northern cities vowel shift, and does not partic-p-te as strongly in the california vowel shift, or the canadian raising as do other regional accents.

because of its lack of any distinguishing vowel shift, the accent is very similar to and hard to distinguish from conservative speakers in other dialect regions especially the northern midlands, california, and the praries.
stephanie: i’m from holland
lacey: is that where they have those giant fans?
stephanie: yes, they’re called windmeals.
lacey: sav
eating the wind with a fork and a knife.
commonly found near wind mills
and spudgys.
i’m hungry, let’s get a quick wind meal.
the correct spelling of the word ‘windmill’, according to it’s typical pr-nunciation.

this variant of the word is commonly used by those of the pacific northwest and puget sound regions, whose accents are considered to be “very neutral” to most americans and canadians.

the northwest’s accent is one of the closest living accents to conservative general american english.

it lacks the northern cities vowel shift, and does not partic-p-te as strongly in the california vowel shift, or the canadian raising as do other regional accents.

because of its lack of any distinguishing vowel shift, the accent is very similar to and hard to distinguish from conservative speakers in other dialect regions especially the northern midlands, california, and the praries.
stephanie: i’m from holland
lacey: is that where they have those giant fans?
stephanie: yes, they’re called windmeals.
lacey: sav.
the correct spelling of the word ‘windmill’, according to it’s typical pr-nunciation.

this variant of the word is commonly used by those of the pacific northwest and puget sound regions, whose accents are considered to be “very neutral” to most americans and canadians.

the northwest’s accent is one of the closest living accents to conservative general american english.

it lacks the northern cities vowel shift, and does not partic-p-te as strongly in the california vowel shift, or the canadian raising as do other regional accents.

because of its lack of any distinguishing vowel shift, the accent is very similar to and hard to distinguish from conservative speakers in other dialect regions especially the northern midlands, california, and the praries.
stephanie: i’m from holland
lacey: is that where they have those giant fans?
stephanie: yes, they’re called windmeals.
lacey: sav.

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