any chiefly African shrub belonging to the genus Aloe, of the lily family, certain species of which yield a fiber.
aloes, (used with a singular verb) .
the fragrant, resinous wood of an East Indian tree, Aquilaria agallocha, of the mezereum family, used as incense in the Orient.
Historical Examples

The bitter substances of aloes dissolved in 800 parts of water, at 59 F., but in a smaller quantity of boiling water.
Quarterly Journal of Science, Literature and the Arts, July-December, 1827 Various

Sleep tranquilly in your lairs amongst the aloes and the cactus!
Tartarin de Tarascon Alphonse Daudet

On the spot where he died he encamped; and caused the body to be embalmed with balsam, myrrh, and aloes.
Mediaeval Tales Various

Foureau made complaints that the pills of aloes gave him hemorrhoids.
Bouvard and Pcuchet Gustave Flaubert

Dr. Taylor says that aloes and colocynth are the basis of Morrisons pills, which in many instances have induced fatal purging.
Memoranda on Poisons Thomas Hawkes Tanner

At the foot are the palms and aloes of the tropics, with the corn, wine, and oil of Italy.
A Jar of Honey from Mount Hybla Leigh Hunt

The palms, the aloes, the tangled woods about the camp, are black as night; all else is a flood of airy silver.
Rita Laura E. Richards

Even the bitterness of quinine and aloes may be prevented by this means.
Mrs. Hale’s Receipts for the Million Sarah Josepha Hale

Or the following may be used instead: aloes, powdered opium, and gum camphor in equal parts; mix.
Special Report on Diseases of Cattle U.S. Department of Agriculture

Naples has a touch of the tropics; cacti, aloes, and palm trees, are not of our clime.
Three Months Abroad Anna Vivanti

noun (functioning as sing)
Also called aloes wood another name for eaglewood
bitter aloes, a bitter purgative drug made from the leaves of several species of aloe
another name for eaglewood
noun (pl) -oes
any plant of the liliaceous genus Aloe, chiefly native to southern Africa, with fleshy spiny-toothed leaves and red or yellow flowers
American aloe, another name for century plant

Old English alewe “fragrant resin of an East Indian tree,” a Biblical usage, from Latin aloe, from Greek aloe, translating Hebrew ahalim (plural, perhaps ultimately from a Dravidian language).

The Greek word probably was chosen for resemblance of sound to the Hebrew, because the Greek and Latin words referred originally to a genus of plants with spiky flowers and bitter juice, used as a purgative drug, a sense which appeared in English late 14c. The word was then misapplied to the American agave plant in 1680s. The “true aloe” consequently is called aloe vera.

aloe al·oe (āl’ō)

Any of various chiefly African plants of the genus Aloe, having rosettes of succulent, often spiny-margined leaves and long stalks bearing yellow, orange, or red tubular flowers.

Aloe vera.

Any of various laxative drugs obtained from the processed juice of a certain species of aloe.

(Heb. ‘ahalim), a fragrant wood (Num. 24:6; Ps. 45:8; Prov. 7:17; Cant. 4:14), the Aquilaria agallochum of botanists, or, as some suppose, the costly gum or perfume extracted from the wood. It is found in China, Siam, and Northern India, and grows to the height sometimes of 120 feet. This species is of great rarity even in India. There is another and more common species, called by Indians aghil, whence Europeans have given it the name of Lignum aquile, or eagle-wood. Aloewood was used by the Egyptians for embalming dead bodies. Nicodemus brought it (pounded aloe-wood) to embalm the body of Christ (John 19:39); but whether this was the same as that mentioned elsewhere is uncertain. The bitter aloes of the apothecary is the dried juice of the leaves Aloe vulgaris.


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