Annoy



to disturb or bother (a person) in a way that displeases, troubles, or slightly irritates.
to molest; harm.
to be bothersome or troublesome.
Archaic. an .
Contemporary Examples

They fascinate and annoy middle-class Indians; they preserve Indian democracy—and show us its fundamental limitations.
The Unstoppable Gandhi Aravind Adiga April 22, 2009

A lot of people would say bad stuff about him, and it used to annoy me.
Iraq’s Next First Daughter? Michael Hastings March 11, 2010

It was a good and realistic response, but one likely to annoy the conservative base.
Newt Gingrich’s Immigration Stance Won’t Play With Conservatives Michelle Goldberg November 22, 2011

One pollster said a showy pregnancy could just “annoy people.”
The Strauss-Kahn Conspiracy Firestorm Tracy McNicoll May 18, 2011

[A]s he climbs the political ladder, he seems destined to annoy some more people along the way.
What Makes Ted Cruz Tick? Justin Green April 1, 2013

Historical Examples

Of course you don’t want to tease, annoy, or step on them, or you may find them loaded.
All about Ferrets and Rats Adolph Isaacsen

Something in his brother’s meditative back seemed to annoy him.
The Coryston Family Mrs. Humphry Ward

Vainly, too, the Spaniards strove to post guns near enough to annoy the fleet.
The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 1-20 Various

The power men possess to annoy me I give them by a weak curiosity.
Essays, First Series Ralph Waldo Emerson

We will ride on ahead, since it is likely to annoy you, but I must go into Annapolis this morning.
Peggy Stewart at School Gabrielle E. Jackson

verb
to irritate or displease
to harass with repeated attacks
v.

late 13c., from Anglo-French anuier, Old French enoiier, anuier “to weary, vex, anger; be troublesome or irksome to,” from Late Latin inodiare “make loathsome,” from Latin (esse) in odio “(it is to me) hateful,” ablative of odium “hatred” (see odium). Earliest form of the word in English was as a noun, c.1200, “feeling of irritation, displeasure, distaste.” Related: Annoyed; annoying; annoyingly. Middle English also had annoyful and annoyous (both late 14c.).

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