Annoyed



to disturb or bother (a person) in a way that displeases, troubles, or slightly irritates.
to molest; harm.
to be bothersome or troublesome.
Archaic. an .
Contemporary Examples

Each observer seems to have been annoyed by a different Strauss-Kahn turn of phrase in the 24-minute interview.
DSK: the Fallout Continues Tracy McNicoll September 19, 2011

In fact, we—if I could be a bit of pop-culture Lorax for the moment and speak for all of us—are kind of annoyed that she is.
‘Boy Meets World’ Fans Will Hate ‘Girl Meets World’ Kevin Fallon June 25, 2014

And if the patients whined or annoyed her, she allegedly killed them to shut them up.
Nurse Nasty Suspected of Killing 38 People in Italy Barbie Latza Nadeau October 14, 2014

Nevertheless, through the ages, a rare individual emerges who is annoyed to no end by the inefficiencies inherent in language.
Do You Speak Klingon? Stephen Brown June 13, 2009

After it was over, I was not surprised, I was annoyed by having been misled by the quiet as it were.
Israel’s Secret Iran Attack Plan: Electronic Warfare Eli Lake November 15, 2011

Historical Examples

The same things that have annoyed me would certainly have annoyed you.
The Letters of Cicero, Volume 1 Marcus Tullius Cicero

I could see she was annoyed and a little worried, because he was past taking notice.
The Spenders Harry Leon Wilson

“I am so sorry if this has annoyed you,” Lessingham regretted.
The Zeppelin’s Passenger E. Phillips Oppenheim

Ordinarily he would not have heard them at all; now they annoyed him.
The Leopard Woman Stewart Edward White

I only felt that Frau Doktor M. is so annoyed when no one offers to answer a question, and so I took it on.
A Young Girl’s Diary An Anonymous Young Girl

verb
to irritate or displease
to harass with repeated attacks
adj.

“vexed, peeved, offended,” late 13c., past participle adjective from annoy (v.).
v.

late 13c., from Anglo-French anuier, Old French enoiier, anuier “to weary, vex, anger; be troublesome or irksome to,” from Late Latin inodiare “make loathsome,” from Latin (esse) in odio “(it is to me) hateful,” ablative of odium “hatred” (see odium). Earliest form of the word in English was as a noun, c.1200, “feeling of irritation, displeasure, distaste.” Related: Annoyed; annoying; annoyingly. Middle English also had annoyful and annoyous (both late 14c.).

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    causing ; irritatingly bothersome: annoying delays. to disturb or bother (a person) in a way that displeases, troubles, or slightly irritates. to molest; harm. to be bothersome or troublesome. Archaic. an . Contemporary Examples Is it annoying that every time you sit down for one of these Scientology comes up? Paul Haggis on Scientology, the […]



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    causing ; irritatingly bothersome: annoying delays. Contemporary Examples But Free to Be wasn’t politically-correct in an annoyingly preachy way. ‘Free to Be…You and Me’ Did Not Emasculate Men Emily Shire March 10, 2014 On top of his wealth and privilege, Osbourne is annoyingly driven. What a Sad Little Empire Britain Has Become Janine di Giovanni […]

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    causing ; irritatingly bothersome: annoying delays. adjective causing irritation or displeasure



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