Aught



anything whatever; any part:
for aught I know.
Archaic. in any degree; at all; in any respect.
a cipher (0); zero.
aughts, the first decade of any century, especially the years 1900 through 1909 or 2000 through 2009.
to own; possess.
to owe (someone or something); be obligated to.
possessed of.
Archaic.

ownership; possession.
property; a possession.

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.
Historical Examples

Only to intimate friends is there aught singular in his behaving as he now does.
Gwen Wynn Mayne Reid

For aught he knew, she might already have escaped or be married to Peter Brome.
Fair Margaret H. Rider Haggard

If you have aught to say touching matters foreign to this, speak, and I can listen; then, prithee depart.
Captain Kyd, Vol. II Joseph Holt Ingraham

Hereupon, Mr. Godfrey asked if there was aught evil in the book.
The Works of Whittier, Volume V (of VII) John Greenleaf Whittier

I imagine that this has much more to do with peculiarities of the Chinese civilization than aught else.
Man and His Migrations R. G. (Robert Gordon) Latham

In the sheer youth of her (he realized) more than in aught else, lay her chiefest charm.
The Black Bag Louis Joseph Vance

They have reached the apotheosis of flowerhood—the highest destiny vouchsafed to aught that grows.
Lippincott’s Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 22. July, 1878. Various

A man cannot do aught but his best, but that will I strive to do this day.
The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Howard Pyle

And why, if we can help it, should public money ever be spent for aught but the public good?
Papers and Proceedings of the Twenty-Third General Meeting of the American Library Association Various

I can not think that Nature has aught to do with these naked inequalities.
The Book of Khalid Ameen Rihani

pronoun
anything at all; anything whatever (esp in the phrase for aught I know)
adverb
(dialect) in any least part; to any degree
noun
a less common word for nought
n.

“something,” Old English awiht “aught, anything, something,” literally “e’er a whit,” from Proto-Germanic *aiwi “ever” (from PIE *aiw- “vital force, life, long life, eternity;” see eon) + *wihti “thing, anything whatever” (see wight). In Shakespeare, Milton and Pope, aught and ought occur indiscriminately.

“nothing, zero,” faulty separation of a naught (see naught; cf. also adder for the separation problem).

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