Clubbing



[kluhb-ing] /ˈklʌb ɪŋ/

noun, Informal.
1.
the activity of going to nightclubs, especially to dance to popular music, drink, and socialize:
Clubbing every night is expensive, not to mention tiring.
[kluhb] /klʌb/
noun
1.
a heavy stick, usually thicker at one end than at the other, suitable for use as a weapon; a cudgel.
2.
a group of persons organized for a social, literary, athletic, political, or other purpose:
They organized a computer club.
3.
the building or rooms occupied by such a group.
4.
an organization that offers its subscribers certain benefits, as discounts, bonuses, or interest, in return for regular purchases or payments:
a book club; a record club; a Christmas club.
5.
Sports.

6.
a nightclub, especially one in which people dance to popular music, drink, and socialize:
Last night we went to all the clubs in town.
7.
a black trefoil-shaped figure on a playing card.
8.
a card bearing such figures.
9.
clubs, (used with a singular or plural verb) the suit so marked:
Clubs is trump. Clubs are trump.
10.
.
11.
Nautical.

verb (used with object), clubbed, clubbing.
12.
to beat with or as with a club.
13.
to gather or form into a clublike mass.
14.
to unite; combine; join together.
15.
to contribute as one’s share toward a joint expense; make up by joint contribution (often followed by up or together):
They clubbed their dollars together to buy the expensive present.
16.
to defray by proportional shares.
17.
to hold (a rifle, shotgun, etc.) by the barrel, so as to use the stock as a club.
verb (used without object), clubbed, clubbing.
18.
Informal. to go to nightclubs, especially to dance, drink, and socialize:
The students at that university go clubbing every Friday night.
19.
to combine or join together, as for a common purpose.
20.
to attend a club or a club’s activities.
21.
to gather into a mass.
22.
to contribute to a common fund.
23.
Nautical. to drift in a current with an anchor, usually rigged with a spring, dragging or dangling to reduce speed.
adjective
24.
of or relating to a club.
25.
consisting of a combination of foods offered at the price set on the menu:
They allow no substitutions on the club luncheon.
/ˈklʌbɪŋ/
noun
1.
the activity of frequenting nightclubs and similar establishments
/klʌb/
noun
1.
a stout stick, usually with one end thicker than the other, esp one used as a weapon
2.
a stick or bat used to strike the ball in various sports, esp golf See golf club (sense 1)
3.
short for Indian club
4.
a group or association of people with common aims or interests: a wine club
5.

6.
a building in which elected, fee-paying members go to meet, dine, read, etc
7.
a commercial establishment in which people can drink and dance; disco See also nightclub
8.
(mainly Brit) an organization, esp in a shop, set up as a means of saving
9.
(Brit) an informal word for friendly society
10.

11.
(nautical)

12.
(Brit, slang) in the club, pregnant
13.
(Brit, slang) on the club, away from work due to sickness, esp when receiving sickness benefit
verb clubs, clubbing, clubbed
14.
(transitive) to beat with or as if with a club
15.
(often foll by together) to gather or become gathered into a group
16.
(often foll by together) to unite or combine (resources, efforts, etc) for a common purpose
17.
(transitive) to use (a rifle or similar firearm) as a weapon by holding the barrel and hitting with the butt
18.
(intransitive) (nautical) to drift in a current, reducing speed by dragging anchor
noun

See nightclubbing
n.

c.1200, “thick stick used as a weapon,” from Old Norse klubba “cudgel” or a similar Scandinavian source (cf. Swedish klubba, Danish klubbe), assimilated from Proto-Germanic *klumbon, related to clump (n.). Old English words for this were sagol, cycgel. Specific sense of “bat used in games” is from mid-15c.

The club suit in the deck of cards (1560s) bears the correct name (Spanish basto, Italian bastone), but the pattern adopted on English cards is the French trefoil. Cf. Danish klőver, Dutch klaver “a club at cards,” literally “a clover.”

The social club (1660s) apparently evolved from this word from the verbal sense “gather in a club-like mass” (1620s), then, as a noun, “association of people” (1640s).

We now use the word clubbe for a sodality in a tavern. [John Aubrey, 1659]

Admission to membership of clubs is commonly by ballot. Clubs are now an important feature of social life in all large cities, many of them occupying large buildings containing reading-rooms, libraries, restaurants, etc. [Century Dictionary, 1902]

I got a good mind to join a club and beat you over the head with it. [Rufus T. Firefly]

Club sandwich recorded by 1899, apparently as a type of sandwich served in clubs; club soda is 1877, originally a proprietary name.

v.

“to hit with a club,” 1590s, from club (v.). Meaning “gather in a club-like mass” is from 1620s. Related: Clubbed; clubbing.

CLUB, verb (military). — In manoeuvring troops, so to blunder the word of command that the soldiers get into a position from which they cannot extricate themselves by ordinary tactics. [Farmer & Henley]

clubbing club·bing (klŭb’ĭng)
n.
A condition affecting the fingers and toes in which the extremities are broadened and the nails are shiny and abnormally curved.

noun

Participation in a party scene, individually or as part of a group, esp in an urban setting; going out to nightclubs: tired of reading about Paris Hilton and Lindsey Lohan’s clubbing

Related Terms

bottle club, deuce of clubs, key club, mile-high club, rap club, welcome to the club
see: join the club

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Clubby

    [kluhb-ee] /ˈklʌb i/ adjective, clubbier, clubbiest. 1. characteristic of a : The room had a warm, clubby atmosphere. 2. very friendly; intimate; chummy: He became clubby with the bartender, who slipped him many free drinks. 3. socially exclusive; cliquish: Their group is very clubby and unfriendly. 4. inclined to join . /ˈklʌbɪ/ adjective -bier, -biest […]

  • Club-car

    noun 1. a railroad passenger car equipped with easy chairs, card tables, a buffet, etc.



  • Club-chair

    noun 1. a heavily upholstered chair having solid sides and a low back.

  • Club culture

    noun 1. the practice of protecting the reputation of one’s workforce in the face of criticism, above all other considerations



Disclaimer: Clubbing definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.