a person who .
disagreeing or dissenting, as in opinion or attitude:
a ban on dissident magazines.
Contemporary Examples

Though they were released a day later, this crackdown sent shockwaves through the dissident community in Egypt.
Egypt’s Internet Crackdown David Keyes January 24, 2010

Another type altogether, forged from a different metal, more businessman than dissident, more cynic than militant?
The Mystery of Mikhail Khodorkovsky Bernard-Henri Lévy January 1, 2014

The dissident group emphasizes that it is not moving to oust Mullah Omar.
Taliban Forces Desperate to Hear from Their Absent Leader, Mullah Omar Ron Moreau April 30, 2013

“They deal with us as if we were their property, and that will never change,” said dissident Wadid Hadad.
Assad’s Move Against Facebook Rula Jebreal November 6, 2011

It features a scantily clad woman wearing a balaclava and holding a sign championing the dissident feminist anti-Putin punk band.
Miley Cyrus Twerking, Usher as Michael Jackson & More Viral Videos The Daily Beast Video March 29, 2013

Historical Examples

dissident individuals and groups are singled out for criticism by the Politburo.
Area Handbook for Bulgaria Eugene K. Keefe, Violeta D. Baluyut, William Giloane, Anne K. Long, James M. Moore, and Neda A. Walpole

Hoxha silenced the dissident elements, however, and had most of them expelled from the Party or arrested.
Area Handbook for Albania Eugene K. Keefe

And after tonight, I wasn’t sure that I was in any better shape than a Chinese dissident.
Little Brother Cory Doctorow

Moreover, these dissident patterns merge into a remarkably harmonious, almost normal, average curve.
A Quantitative Study of the Nocturnal Migration of Birds. George H. Lowery.

About three in the morning, the dissident Armed-Forces have met.
The French Revolution Thomas Carlyle

disagreeing; dissenting
a person who disagrees, esp one who disagrees with the government

1530s, from Latin dissidentem (nominative dissidens), present participle of dissidere “to be remote; disagree, be removed from,” literally “to sit apart,” from dis- “apart” (see dis-) + sedere “to sit” (see sedentary).

1766, in reference to Protestants, from dissident (adj.). In the political sense first used 1940, coinciding with the rise of 20c. totalitarian systems, especially with reference to the Soviet Union.


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