Jerry



[jer-ee] /ˈdʒɛr i/

adjective, Building Trades Slang.
1.
of inferior materials or workmanship.
[jer-ee] /ˈdʒɛr i/
noun, plural jerries. Chiefly British Slang.
1.
a chamber pot.
[jer-ee] /ˈdʒɛr i/
noun
1.
a male given name, form of , , , and .
2.
a female given name, form of .
[jer-ee] /ˈdʒɛr i/
noun, plural Jerries. Older Slang: Sometimes Offensive.
1.
a German, especially a German soldier.
2.
Germans collectively.
[west] /wɛst/
noun
1.
Benjamin, 1738–1820, U.S. painter, in England after 1763.
2.
Jerome Alan (“Jerry”) born 1938, U.S. basketball player, coach, and executive.
3.
Mae, 1892?–1980, U.S. actress.
4.
Nathanael (Nathan Wallenstein Weinstein) 1902?–40, U.S. novelist.
5.
Paul, born 1930, U.S. poet, essayist, and novelist, born in England.
6.
Dame Rebecca (Cicily Isabel Fairfield Andrews) 1892–1983, English novelist, journalist, and critic, born in Ireland.
[broun] /braʊn/
noun
1.
Charles Brockden
[brok-duh n] /ˈbrɒk dən/ (Show IPA), 1771–1810, U.S. novelist.
2.
Clifford (“Brownie”) 1930–56, U.S. jazz trumpeter.
3.
Edmund Gerald, Jr (“Jerry”) born 1938, U.S. politician: governor of California 1975–83.
4.
Herbert Charles, 1912–2004, U.S. chemist, born in England: Nobel Prize 1979.
5.
James Nathaniel (“Jimmy”) born 1936, U.S. football player and actor.
6.
John (“Old Brown of Osawatomie”) 1800–59, U.S. abolitionist: leader of the attack at Harpers Ferry, where he was captured, tried for treason, and hanged.
7.
Margaret Wise, 1910–52, U.S. author noted for early-childhood books.
8.
Olympia, 1835–1926, U.S. women’s-rights activist and Universalist minister: first American woman ordained by a major church.
9.
Robert, 1773–1858, Scottish botanist.
[gahr-see-uh] /gɑrˈsi ə/
noun
1.
Jerome John (“Jerry”) 1942–95, U.S. rock guitarist, singer, and songwriter.
/ˈdʒɛrɪ/
noun (pl) -ries
1.
(Brit) an informal word for chamber pot
2.
short for jeroboam
/ˈdʒɛrɪ/
noun (Brit, slang) (pl) -ries
1.
a German, esp a German soldier
2.
the Germans collectively: Jerry didn’t send his bombers out last night
/wɛst/
noun
1.
one of the four cardinal points of the compass, 270° clockwise from north and 180° from east
2.
the direction along a parallel towards the sunset, at 270° clockwise from north
3.
(often capital) the west, any area lying in or towards the west related adjectives Hesperian Occidental
4.
(cards) (usually capital) the player or position at the table corresponding to west on the compass
adjective
5.
situated in, moving towards, or facing the west
6.
(esp of the wind) from the west
adverb
7.
in, to, or towards the west
8.
(archaic) (of the wind) from the west
9.
(informal) go west

/wɛst/
noun the West
1.
the western part of the world contrasted historically and culturally with the East or Orient; the Occident
2.
(formerly) the non-Communist countries of Europe and America contrasted with the Communist states of the East Compare East (sense 2)
3.
(in the US)

4.
(in the ancient and medieval world) the Western Roman Empire and, later, the Holy Roman Empire
adjective
5.

/wɛst/
noun
1.
Benjamin. 1738–1820, US painter, in England from 1763
2.
Kanye, born 1977, US rap singer and producer; his albums include The College Dropout (2004) and Graduation (2007)
3.
Mae. 1892–1980, US film actress
4.
Nathanael, real name Nathan Weinstein. 1903–40, US novelist: author of Miss Lonely-Hearts (1933) and The Day of the Locust (1939)
5.
Dame Rebecca, real name Cicily Isabel Andrews (née Fairfield). 1892–1983, British journalist, novelist, and critic
/braʊn/
noun
1.
any of various colours, such as those of wood or earth, produced by low intensity light in the wavelength range 620–585 nanometres
2.
a dye or pigment producing these colours
3.
brown cloth or clothing: dressed in brown
4.
any of numerous mostly reddish-brown butterflies of the genera Maniola, Lasiommata, etc, such as M. jurtina (meadow brown): family Satyridae
adjective
5.
of the colour brown
6.
(of bread) made from a flour that has not been bleached or bolted, such as wheatmeal or wholemeal flour
7.
deeply tanned or sunburnt
verb
8.
to make (esp food as a result of cooking) brown or (esp of food) to become brown
/braʊn/
noun
1.
Sir Arthur Whitten (ˈwɪtən). 1886–1948, British aviator who with J.W. Alcock made the first flight across the Atlantic (1919)
2.
Ford Madox. 1821–93, British painter, associated with the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. His paintings include The Last of England (1865) and Work (1865)
3.
George (Alfred), Lord George-Brown. 1914–85, British Labour politician; vice-chairman and deputy leader of the Labour party (1960–70); foreign secretary 1966–68
4.
George Mackay. 1921–96, Scottish poet, novelist, and short-story writer. His works, which include the novels Greenvoe (1972) and Magnus (1973), reflect the history and culture of Orkney
5.
(James) Gordon. born 1951, British Labour politician; Chancellor of the Exchequer (1997–2007); prime minister (2007–10)
6.
Herbert Charles. 1912–2004, US chemist, who worked on the compounds of boron. Nobel prize for chemistry 1979
7.
James. 1933–2006, US soul singer and songwriter, noted for his dynamic stage performances and for his commitment to Black rights
8.
John. 1800–59, US abolitionist leader, hanged after leading an unsuccessful rebellion of slaves at Harper’s Ferry, Virginia
9.
Lancelot, called Capability Brown. 1716–83, British landscape gardener
10.
Michael (Stuart). born 1941, US physician: shared the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine (1985) for work on cholesterol
11.
Robert. 1773–1858, Scottish botanist who was the first to observe the Brownian movement in fluids
n.

World War I British Army slang for “a German, the Germans,” 1919, probably an alteration of German, but also said to be from the shape of the German helmet, which was thought to resemble a jerry, British slang for “chamber pot” (1827), this being probably an abbreviation of jeroboam. Hence jerry-can “5-gallon metal container” (1943), a type first used by German troops in World War II, later adopted by the Allies.
adj.

Old English brun “dark, dusky,” developing a definite color sense only 13c., from Proto-Germanic *brunaz (cf. Old Norse brunn, Danish brun, Old Frisian and Old High German brun, Dutch bruin, German braun), from PIE *bher- (3) “shining, brown” (cf. Lithuanian beras “brown”), related to *bheros “dark animal” (cf. beaver, bear (n.), and Greek phrynos “toad,” literally “the brown animal”).

The Old English word also had a sense of “brightness, shining,” preserved only in burnish. The Germanic word was adopted into Romanic (e.g. Middle Latin brunus, Italian and Spanish bruno, French brun). Brown Bess, slang name for old British Army flintlock musket, first recorded 1785.
v.

c.1300, “to become brown,” from brown (adj.). From 1560s as “to make brown.” Related: Browned; browning.
n.

“brown color,” c.1600, from brown (adj.).

Old English west “in or toward the west,” from Proto-Germanic *wes-t- (cf. Old Norse vestr, Old Frisian, Middle Dutch, Dutch west, Old High German -west, only in compounds, German west), from PIE *wes- (source of Greek hesperos, Latin vesper “evening, west”), perhaps an enlarged form of root *we- “to go down” (cf. Sanskrit avah “downward”), and thus literally “direction in which the sun sets.” Cf. also High German dialectal abend “west,” literally “evening.”

French ouest, Spanish oeste are from English. West used in geopolitical sense from World War I (Britain, France, Italy, as opposed to Germany and Austria-Hungary); as contrast to Communist Russia (later to the Soviet bloc) it is first recorded in 1918. West Indies is recorded from 1550s.

Brown (broun), Michael. Born 1941.

American geneticist. He shared a 1985 Nobel Prize for discoveries related to cholesterol metabolism.

noun

noun

A German soldier; kraut, krauthead

[WWI Army fr British; fr the German helmet, which was likened to a jerry, ”chamber pot,” found by 1827]

Related Terms

fucking well told

adjective

Opposed to environmental preservation and restoration •The opposite of green: The chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers is judged brown, rather than green, on the issue of timetables for climate control (1990s+)

verb

also brown-hole To do anal intercourse; bugger, bunghole (1930s+)
geriatric

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    [jer-ee-bild] /ˈdʒɛr iˌbɪld/ verb (used with object), jerry-built, jerry-building. 1. to build cheaply and flimsily. verb -builds, -building, -built 1. (transitive) to build (houses, flats, etc) badly using cheap materials

  • Jerry-built

    [jer-ee-bilt] /ˈdʒɛr iˌbɪlt/ adjective 1. built cheaply and flimsily. 2. contrived or developed in a haphazard, unsubstantial fashion, as a project or organization. [jer-ee-bild] /ˈdʒɛr iˌbɪld/ verb (used with object), jerry-built, jerry-building. 1. to build cheaply and flimsily. verb -builds, -building, -built 1. (transitive) to build (houses, flats, etc) badly using cheap materials adj. 1869, […]



  • Jerry-can

    noun 1. Also called blitz can. Military. a narrow, flat-sided, 5-gallon (19-liter) container for fluids, as fuel. 2. British. a can with a capacity of 4½ imperial gallons (5.4 U.S. gallons or 20.4 liters). noun 1. a flat-sided can with a capacity of between 4.5 and 5 gallons used for storing or transporting liquids, esp […]

  • Jerry-rig

    [jer-ee-rig] /ˈdʒɛr iˌrɪg/ verb (used with object), jerry-rigged, jerry-rigging. 1. .



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