Meeting



[mee-ting] /ˈmi tɪŋ/

noun
1.
the act of coming together:
a chance meeting in the park.
2.
an assembly or conference of persons for a specific purpose:
a ten o’clock business meeting.
3.
the body of persons present at an assembly or conference:
to read a report to the meeting.
4.
a hostile encounter; duel.
5.
an assembly for religious worship, especially of Quakers.
6.
.
7.
a place or point of contact; junction; union:
the meeting of two roads; the meeting of the waters.
Idioms
8.
take a meeting, Informal. to hold, conduct, or participate in a meeting:
The producer took a meeting with the cast of the film.
[meet] /mit/
verb (used with object), met, meeting.
1.
to come upon; come into the presence of; encounter:
I would meet him on the street at unexpected moments.
2.
to become acquainted with; be introduced to:
I’ve never met your cousin.
3.
to join at an agreed or designated place or time:
Meet me in St. Louis.
4.
to be present at the arrival of:
to meet a train.
5.
to come to or before (one’s notice, or a means of noticing, as the eyes or ears):
A peculiar sight met my eyes.
6.
to come into the company of (a person, group, etc.) in dealings, conference, etc.
7.
to face, eye, etc., directly or without avoidance.
8.
to come into physical contact, juxtaposition, or collision with:
The two cars met each other head-on at high speed.
9.
to encounter in opposition, conflict, or contest:
Harvard meets Yale next week in football.
10.
to oppose:
to meet charges with countercharges.
11.
to cope or deal effectively with (an objection, difficulty, etc.).
12.
to comply with; fulfill; satisfy:
to meet a deadline; to meet a demand.
13.
to pay in full:
How will you meet expenses?
14.
to come into conformity with (wishes, expectations, views, etc.).
15.
to encounter in experience:
to meet hostility.
verb (used without object), met, meeting.
16.
to come together, face to face, or into company:
We met on the street.
17.
to assemble for action, conference, or other common purpose, as a committee, legislature, or class:
The board of directors will meet on Tuesday.
18.
to become personally acquainted.
19.
to come into contact or form a junction, as lines, planes, or areas:
The two lines meet to form an angle.
20.
to be conjoined or united.
21.
to concur or agree.
22.
to come together in opposition or conflict, as adversaries or hostile forces.
noun
23.
an assembly, as of persons and hounds for a hunt or swimmers or runners for a race or series of races:
a track meet.
24.
those assembled.
25.
the place of such an assembling.
26.
Mathematics. (def 3a).
Verb phrases
27.
meet with,

Idioms
28.
meet cute. (def 6).
29.
meet halfway,

30.
well met, Archaic. welcome.
/ˈmiːtɪŋ/
noun
1.
an act of coming together; encounter
2.
an assembly or gathering
3.
a conjunction or union
4.
a sporting competition, as of athletes, or of horse racing
/miːt/
verb meets, meeting, met
1.
sometimes foll by up or(US) with. to come together (with), either by design or by accident; encounter: I met him unexpectedly, we met at the station
2.
to come into or be in conjunction or contact with (something or each other): the roads meet in the town, the sea meets the sky
3.
(transitive) to come to or be at the place of arrival of: to meet a train
4.
to make the acquaintance of or be introduced to (someone or each other): have you two met?
5.
to gather in the company of (someone or each other): the board of directors meets on Tuesday
6.
to come into the presence of (someone or each other) as opponents: Joe meets Fred in the boxing match
7.
(transitive) to cope with effectively; satisfy: to meet someone’s demands
8.
(transitive) to be apparent to (esp in the phrase meet the eye)
9.
(transitive) to return or counter: to meet a blow with another
10.
to agree with (someone or each other): we met him on the price he suggested
11.
(transitive) sometimes foll by with. to experience; suffer: he met his death in a road accident
12.
to occur together: courage and kindliness met in him
13.
(transitive) (Caribbean) to find (a person, situation, etc) in a specified condition: I met the door open
14.
meet and greet, (of a celebrity, politician, etc) to have a session of being introduced to and questioned by members of the public or journalists
noun
15.
the assembly of hounds, huntsmen, etc, prior to a hunt
16.
a meeting, esp a sports meeting
17.
(US) the place where the paths of two railway trains meet or cross
18.
meet-and-greet, a session where a celebrity, etc, is introduced to or questioned by members of the public or journalists
/miːt/
adjective
1.
(archaic) proper, fitting, or correct
n.

“action of coming together,” Old English gemeting, verbal noun from meet (v.). Meaning “gathering of people for discussion, etc.” is from 1510s. In 17c., it was applied generally to worship assemblies of nonconformists, but this now is retained mostly by Quakers.
v.

Old English metan “to find, find out; fall in with, encounter; obtain,” from Proto-Germanic *motjan (cf. Old Norse mæta, Old Frisian meta, Old Saxon motian “to meet,” Gothic gamotijan), from PIE root *mod- “to meet, assemble.” Related to Old English gemot “meeting.” Meaning “to assemble” is from 1520s. Of things, “to come into contact,” c.1300. Related: Met; meeting. To meet (someone) halfway in the figurative sense is from 1620s.
adj.

“proper, fitting,” Old English gemæte, Anglian *gemete, “suitable, having the same dimensions,” from Proto-Germanic *ga-mætijaz (cf. Old Norse mætr, Old High German gimagi, German gemäß “suitable”), from collective prefix *ga- + PIE *med- “to measure” (see medical (adj.)). The basic formation is thus the same as that of commensurate.
n.

1831 in the sporting sense, originally of gatherings for hunting, from meet (v.).

noun

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