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Dwarf

Dwarf: Someone with dwarfism, which is now more correctly called short stature. People with dwarfism (short stature) also consider themselves little people, as in the Little People of America.

Dwarfism

Dwarfism: Abnormally short stature. Some forms are hereditary. The Little People of America (LPA) define dwarfism as an adult height of 148 cm (4 feet 10 inches) or less. Also known as nanism. Dwarfism is now more correctly called short stature. See also specific types, such as Achondroplasia, Hypochondroplasia, Pituitary dwarfism, Seckel syndrome, Thanatophoric dwarfism.

Dwarfism, achondroplastic

Dwarfism, achondroplastic: A genetic disorder of bone growth, achondroplasia is the most common cause of short stature with disproportionately short limbs — dwarfism with short arms and legs. There is a typically large head with prominence of the forehead (frontal bossing), underdevelopment (hypoplasia) of the midface with cheekbones that lack prominence, and a low nasal […]

Dysuria

Our Symptoms article on Burning Urination provides a comprehensive look at the possible causes and treatments of Burning Urination. Dysuria: Pain during urination, or difficulty urinating. Dysuria is usually caused by inflammation of the urethra, frequently as a result of infection.

Dystrophy, myotonic

Dystrophy, myotonic: An inherited disease in which the muscles contract but have decreasing power to relax — this phenomenon is termed myotonia (irritability and prolonged contraction of muscles). The disease also produces leads to a mask-like expressionless face, premature balding, cataracts, and heart arrhythmias (abnormalities in heart rhythm). The onset of such problems is usually […]

Dystrophy, muscular

Dystrophy, muscular: One of a group of genetic diseases characterized by progressive weakness and degeneration of the skeletal or voluntary muscles which control movement. The muscles of the heart and some other involuntary muscles are also affected in some forms of muscular dystrophy, and a few forms involve other organs as well. The major forms […]

Dystrophy, cone

Dystrophy, cone: A disease of the cones, the specialized light-sensitive cells that act as photoreceptors in the retina of the eye, providing sharp central vision and color vision. The cone dystrophies are a form of genetic macular degeneration characterized by progressive deterioration of the cones that leads to the distinctive triad of loss of color […]

Dystrophy, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy

Dystrophy, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal: A genetic autoimmune disease with an extraordinary array of clinical features but characterized most often by at least 2 of the following 3 findings: hypoparathyroidism — underfunction of the parathyroid glands which control calcium, candidiasis (yeast infection), and adrenal insufficiency (underfunction of the adrenal gland). APECED was the first systemic (bodywide) autoimmune […]

Dystonia, torsion

Dystonia, torsion: A form of dystonia known as early-onset torsion dystonia (also called idiopathic or generalized torsion dystonia) begins in childhood around the age of 12. Symptoms typically start in one part of the body, usually in an arm or leg, and eventually spread to the rest of the body within about 5 years. Early-onset […]

Dystonia, Segawa

Dystonia, Segawa: An important variant form of dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD). DRD typically begins in childhood or adolescence with progressive difficulty in walking and, in some cases, with spasticity. DRD, by definition, can be successfully treated with dopa. In Segawa dystonia, the symptoms fluctuate during the day from relative mobility in the morning to increasingly worse […]